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Only 17% Say USA's Democracy Is a Good Example

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  • Only 17% Say USA's Democracy Is a Good Example

    From https://www.pewresearch.org/global/2...-and-politics/
    By Richard Wike, Laura Silver, Janell Fetterolf, Christine Huang and J.J. Moncus
    Title : What People Around the World Like – and Dislike – About American Society and Politics , 01 Nov 2021

    [...A survey of 17 advanced economies highlights the... America’s international image...

    The most positive elements of America’s image are tied to some of its most famous exports...

    The U.S. health care system gets poor reviews...

    Large majorities say discrimination against people based on their race or ethnicity is a serious problem in the U.S., and in most countries, majorities say it is a very serious problem...

    Few believe U.S. democracy, at least in its current state, serves as a good model for other nations. A median of just 17% say democracy in the U.S. is a good example for others to follow, ...]

  • #2
    Cannot disagree, and the country seems to be headed further into the abyss. As former expat (some might say rat), I must say, it is good to have a backup plan in the event the ship continues to sink.

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    • #3
      Waarmstrong , we are the lucky ones as we can choose where to live and bad governance doesn't affect us much .

      Unfortunately most democracies around the world are in bad shape , in my view .

      I always thought that my country's democracy is flawed from the beginning because people don't know the candidates enough to vote well , or the candidates are all bad , there is no penalty for the candidates' false promises/lies , most politicians are incompetent , ...

      In my view , like for any other professional we should require a specific university diploma from every politician candidate for a major public post (maybe a 10 years "political science" university degree ?) .

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      • #4
        I grew up in a small town where the main industry was Iowa State University. The city council at times was dominated by university professors. Governance under the professorial click was no better than, and often worse, than that of the political community, in terms of effectively, equitably and timely addressing the needs of the community.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by waarmstrong View Post
          ... The city council at times was dominated by university professors. Governance under the professorial click was no better that, and often worse, than that of the political community, ...

          I didn't mean a university graduated in any major , but in a specific major which would create professional politicians .

          And of course that , for example , a diploma specific for engineer doesn't necessarily make its holder to be a good engineer , but I cannot imagine any better way to create professional engineers .

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          • #6
            Whatever ones background, OJT seems to work well in separate the wheat from the chaff. I also favor the broadest extension of the franchise coupled with unfettered access to the poles, and term limits to curtail the corruptive influence of exercising power. A professional class of politicians would be the death of democracy.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by waarmstrong View Post
              ...OJT seems to work well in separate the wheat from the chaff. I also favor the broadest extension of the franchise coupled with unfettered access to the poles, ...

              Sorry Waarmstrong , I didn't understand . Could you further explain these 2 ideas ?

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              • #8
                Creating a licensed governing class, the entrance to which is controlled and limited based on the degree or degrees one holds would be good for democracy; would more "effectively, equitably and timely addressing the needs of the community"? Perhaps only persons with a political science BS degrees should be permitted to vote? Or maybe we should go back to the beginning when only white, male, property owning individuals were included in the franchise?

                Limiting the choice of who can run for elected office to professional politicians, like limiting who can vote (these days, primarily by making it more difficult to vote) boils down to politicians picking themselves to exercise the powers of governance. I do not see anything good coming from that.

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                • #9
                  Waarmstrong , this part I understood . What I did not understand are those 2 other points I repeated in post no.7 above .

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by waarmstrong View Post
                    ...the entrance to which is controlled and limited based on the degree..?

                    Maybe not a 10 years degree , but some kind of education is necessary , in my view .

                    Did you mention "on-the-job" training ? If so , maybe you thought like that ? : The elected politician would start only one term (3 years?) later (not the next term like it is now) , and during this time he/she would do "on-the-job" training with the present politician in charge , in order to learn all the subjects involved .

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