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  • Importing Furniture - A problem?

    Hi All

    We are renovating a house in Jakarta and - for the kitchen - want to install Ikea.

    Ikea plan to open in Jakarta end 2014 but we need the kitchen installed by June - if not we will starve to death...!!!

    I was thinking of ordering at Ikea in Singapore and shipping to Jakarta.

    Can anybody here advise - is it possible to import "personal furniture" (still in Ikea boxes)???

    Worried I will be taken for a ride by BEA Cukai........

    Any comments / suggestions to make it easier please let me know...

    Regards
    Nyasar
    Walk quietly and carry a bloody big stick... (Teddy Roosevelt didnt say "bloody" did he?)

  • #2
    Mas/Mbak Nyasar,

    If you go to Facebook, there are some online shops that already does that for you.

    I usually buy my Ikea stuff from Ikea Corner or Toko Barang Ikea on facebook. Hassle free and they have schedule when they are going to purchase the stuff and the approximate date of when you are going to receive your goods.

    It is slightly more expensive the catalogue price, but hey, you don't have to worry about Bea Cukai. All you know is that you pay, they'll give you the date, you have it by your doorstep. That's it.
    [COLOR=black]
    [/COLOR]

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    • #3
      Why would you want Ikea when you could have a kitchen handmade ??

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      • #4
        Originally posted by sweetmaria View Post
        Mas/Mbak Nyasar,

        If you go to Facebook, there are some online shops that already does that for you.

        I usually buy my Ikea stuff from Ikea Corner or Toko Barang Ikea on facebook. Hassle free and they have schedule when they are going to purchase the stuff and the approximate date of when you are going to receive your goods.

        It is slightly more expensive the catalogue price, but hey, you don't have to worry about Bea Cukai. All you know is that you pay, they'll give you the date, you have it by your doorstep. That's it.
        Thanks for the pointer maria... I will take a look at the sites...
        Walk quietly and carry a bloody big stick... (Teddy Roosevelt didnt say "bloody" did he?)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ScooterIndo View Post
          Why would you want Ikea when you could have a kitchen handmade ??
          Hello Scooter... Thanks for the suggestion but I have had 2 kitchens made locally in the 20 years I have lived in Indonesia... Both were unsatisfactory... Have looked around recently and the better quality local kitchen sets cost a ridiculous amount (and still questionable quality)... Overseas I had previously installed an Ikea kitchen and it was perfect... So I would rather do the same here...
          Walk quietly and carry a bloody big stick... (Teddy Roosevelt didnt say "bloody" did he?)

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          • #6




            I'm not an IKEA fan; pardon my bias.

            Natural wood is where it's at for us and living in Indonesia provided an opportunity to consider installing custom made teak cabinets when we remodeled. The result exceeded our expectations and the cost was very reasonable. The above pictures were taken shortly after the installation was completed six year ago and the cabinets only look better now as the grain patterns in the wood deepen and mature. The installation has proved quite durable, as well.

            I am sorry that the OP was disappointed, but my experience suggests that quality Indonesian workmanship is not hard to come by. The choice of a sterile factory-produced laminate where furniture grade teak is readily available leaves me cold.
            Last edited by waarmstrong; 05-04-14, 18:01.

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            • #7
              Very nice!! I was a bit worried about this too when I think about building a house in Jakarta, I too want a proper kitchen that I can cook in.. not just a wet kitchen. Granite/Marble counter top, stainless steel appliances, double door fridge, gas range, double oven, dishwasher, island counter top - all these are my top priorities. I love cooking, so even if we do have maids I still want to cook Happy to know that this can be achieved without having to spend an arm and a leg!
              living to the fullest @

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              • #8
                Waarmy, can you give an approximate price of what the cabinetry/countertop cost? Expats have very different ideas about what "reasonable" should be. I'd guess that $2500-$5000 USD (less appliances) would fit my reasonableness meter. Others would pay $40k at the drop of a hat.
                Sasa Bule is having a bayi!

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                • #9
                  We built a house in Jateng in 2012 with teak doors, sliding windows and window frames, boven (an extravagance in retrospect), and kitchen cabinets.

                  For the fixed items like the frames, we were charged a rate close to the cost of teak, so-called "cost plus" basis. I confirmed this with the manager who used to be in charge of buying teak for a furniture factory where I worked ages ago -- he sat down with his calculator and the dimensions of each door, etc. and came up with close to the price we were charged. So, how do they make money? Well, some of the smaller pieces are leftovers from other jobs, or sold at a discount, the coloration isn't ideal as you'd want with furniture, etc. (FYI, jewelry shops charge close to the international price of gold x karat/24 -- they make their money because customers who return jewelry get only 80% back in exchange, so the shops are basically jewelry rental places.)

                  Anyway, one key issue for quality of cabinets is the quality of wood and whether you or a friend are capable of assessing it. Another is the workmanship, which means spending some time and communication to find out if the tukang actually has built something *the same as or close to* the design you're requesting. If not, you are making yourself a guinea pig.

                  Not sure why the OP referred to "starving" in a light-hearted way. If you're in the house, you can have a temporary cooking area while waiting for the ideal kitchen to be installed -- seems to me that it is a long-term project and worth waiting for, with a little adaptation of habit for a few months.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jaime C View Post
                    Waarmy, can you give an approximate price of what the cabinetry/countertop cost? Expats have very different ideas about what "reasonable" should be. I'd guess that $2500-$5000 USD (less appliances) would fit my reasonableness meter. Others would pay $40k at the drop of a hat.

                    Its been a few years, but I may be able to pull some numbers together. The cabinets and granite were ordered separately. The cabinets were installed by my general contractor and the granite by a specialty sub. I had to install the insinkerator and dishwasher plumbing myself; the general's plumber had no experience with either. The under-cabinet lighting I also installed myself.


                    If I can find anything, I will post it later.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sari.D View Post
                      Very nice!! I was a bit worried about this too when I think about building a house in Jakarta, I too want a proper kitchen that I can cook in.. not just a wet kitchen. Granite/Marble counter top, stainless steel appliances, double door fridge, gas range, double oven, dishwasher, island counter top - all these are my top priorities. I love cooking, so even if we do have maids I still want to cook Happy to know that this can be achieved without having to spend an arm and a leg!
                      If you used the heavenly scented tarasi in your sambel petai/jengkol cooking -to add a certain definition and flavors into sharper focus- then you may need a large bay window with super exhaust fans incorporated into your feng shui kitchen design.

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                      • #12
                        I agree with waarmstrong, decent timber can be done nicely here. I do not understand the passion for Ikea, in my opinion it's horrible and cheap.

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                        • #13
                          Joe, we have an exhaust fan and a back door and a ceiling fan, and terasi is still forbidden in the kitchen.

                          Tempe busuk is ok, but we expect that to consist of raw materials that are left to rot before going to market.

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