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How do Indonesians deal with HUMIDITY?

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  • How do Indonesians deal with HUMIDITY?

    I realize that Indonesia has a very humid weather
    I'm majoring in Marketing and my final project for this semester is to decide on a product to sell in the Indonesian market. It needs to be something innovative and something that can pin-point the NEEDS of the Indonesians

    I decided that a portable humidity remover (dehumidifier) would be a good choice but i've never lived in Indonesia, so i don't have enough information. Are humidity removers widely available in the Indonesian market? Are they easily accessible in local supermarkets?

    please help me out
    this final project is crucial to my final grade...!

    HELP!

  • #2
    Isn't a dehumidifier just a big heater? Sure, it takes out the moisture, but it creates so much heat! A portable aircon would be a lot better. I've seen ones that you wear on your neck.

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    • #3
      High humidity makes it harder for your sweat to evaporate, so it's harder for your body to shed heat. If you have air conditioning at your place, then a dehumidifier is not very useful because you're not sweating. If you don't have AC, then your place must have good ventilation, which makes it very hard to dehumidify. In short: a dehumidifier is of limited use in Indonesia. Perhaps it's useful for laboratories, hospitals, or any other place than requires certain level of humidity, but I don't see it marketed to the average guy on the street.

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      • #4
        I'm gonna give you a freebie, Helen. Make a water-cooled riding jacket. You need to research the number of motorcycle riders in Indonesia (huge), then show riders' strong habit of wearing riding jacket (plenty of pictures on the internet) and the annual temperature chart. Unlike a dehumidifier this product doesn't currently exist, so it qualifies as innovative.

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        • #5
          I'm majoring in Marketing and my final project for this semester is to decide on a product to sell in the Indonesian market. It needs to be something innovative and something that can pin-point the NEEDS of the Indonesians
          Decent, responsible, dedicated and motivated Politicians who are serious about improving the life of the general populace and not just feathering their own nests ...

          Sarcasm mode fully on today! ...
          IknowthatyoubelieveyouunderstandwhatyouthinkIsaid, butI'mnotsureyourealisethatwhatyouheardisnotwhatI meant.

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          • #6
            im sorry for the confusion... my english probably isn't that great. what i meant by dehumidifier isn't the big heating machine.
            let me attach a picture so u can get the general idea of what im trying to say. it's about the size of an adult's hand
            it may be small but its excellent in absorbing moisture within the atmosphere

            i do assume that there are similar products in Indonesia though... if there is... could u tell me the brand name of the product thats sold in Indonesian market? please
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              I think my post didn't show...
              I was attaching our Bagus brand for dehumidifier.
              You can google it then...
              The name is Bagus Serap Air : http://www.bagusgroup.com/hcare5.html

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Helen200 View Post
                im sorry for the confusion... my english probably isn't that great. what i meant by dehumidifier isn't the big heating machine.
                let me attach a picture so u can get the general idea of what im trying to say. it's about the size of an adult's hand
                it may be small but its excellent in absorbing moisture within the atmosphere
                Ohh, THAT. Well, they are available, but are more suited for closets. I'd need about 30 to dry up the air in my house. Sometimes the walls drip because it's so humid and damp.

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                • #9
                  I see, yours is a dehumidifier that uses desiccant material. As others have pointed out, it's available but used mostly for wardrobe or kitchen cabinets.

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                  • #10
                    That desiccant have a certain amount of humidity it can absorb. With the amount of humidity in the open air, and in most homes the doors and windows are open often, you'll run out of that desiccant material before you'll remove any appreciable amount of humidity.

                    You can dry them and reuse them. Matter of fact there are ways to introduce cooler air to the house that's been dehumidified by having gone through a bunch of desiccants.

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                    • #11
                      @ OP Firstly most Indonesians deal with the humidity by "putting up with it".

                      @2 Jared, heating the air does not decrease humidity, it simply allows the air to hold even more moisture.

                      @3 Injun, Yes high humidity does make perspiration less efficient. Aircons, not only lower the ambient temperature but decrease the humidity by cooling the air below its "dew point", that is why aircons have a drain for the moisture they remove from the air. Thus aircons not only reduce the temperature making perspiration less necessary, they also make it more efficient by reducing the humidity.

                      @OP Your dessicant will of course remove moisture from the ambient air in a "closed (air tight) space" but what happens when that closed space is an "open space", can it then decrease humidity. I don't think so, do you?

                      @10 Rabbit, are these methods to reduce "cooler air' that's been de-humidified by passing it through a desicant which must then be re-heated to remove the moisture absorbed more efficient than simple refrigeration to take the air below its dewpoint and thus remove the water. ie via an aircon or similar?

                      The dessicant has to be regenerated surely?

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                      • #12
                        Leyton: depends on what you mean by efficient. If by that you mean can I get you a system that doesn't require electricity from the grid or oil based fuels, then the answer is yes. If you mean does it take less energy overall than aircon...it's a toss (when you include cooling energy). If you don't take into account the construction energy but simply running energy costs, then by excluding the heat produced by the desiccant as it adsorbs the humidity from the conditioned space, then yes it is more efficient.

                        BTW, the regeneration of the desiccant can easily use solar thermal (ie hot house).

                        I applaud you for thinking of energy efficiency, it is the name of the game as we go toward the future. We just have to be careful how it's defined and what efficiencies are being touted.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by rabbit_39 View Post
                          Leyton: depends on what you mean by efficient. If by that you mean can I get you a system that doesn't require electricity from the grid or oil based fuels, then the answer is yes. If you mean does it take less energy overall than aircon...it's a toss (when you include cooling energy). If you don't take into account the construction energy but simply running energy costs, then by excluding the heat produced by the desiccant as it adsorbs the humidity from the conditioned space, then yes it is more efficient.

                          BTW, the regeneration of the desiccant can easily use solar thermal (ie hot house).
                          Simply put Efficiency is the "total energy used in the process minus the energy wasted energy eg waste heat etc" divided by the total energy used in the process.

                          Obviously the efficiency of the generation of the energy used also must be taken in to account for the real picture. :-)

                          With regards to dessicants, how much energy is used in their initial manufacture, what is their efficiency in removing water from the atmosphere and how much energy is needed to regenerate them?

                          Accepting they can be dried out in a "solar furnace" what is the initial energy cost of the solar furnace and how long is its payback time to repay the energy it cost to make it?


                          Originally posted by rabbit_39 View Post
                          I applaud you for thinking of energy efficiency, it is the name of the game as we go toward the future. We just have to be careful how it's defined and what efficiencies are being touted.


                          Thank for the comment, and I fully agree with the bold.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by leyton View Post
                            Simply put Efficiency is the "total energy used in the process minus the energy wasted energy eg waste heat etc" divided by the total energy used in the process.
                            That is the simple view of efficiency, yes. But in real life, the practical efficiency means what resources are abundant/renewable/being recycled/etc and what's not, and how it's being used.

                            In this case, the solar thermal efficiency is high because there is little to no operating cost (in energy or otherwise). The energy to dry the desiccant in this way is essentially "free".

                            A solar furnace can be as simple as a green house with carefully placed vents to remove the moisture via natural convection.

                            If the energy used for the fans and rotating the desiccant as they're used is supplied by PV solar and the construction of the conditioned area is passively efficient, the operating cost can be darn near zero for close to 10 years.

                            And no, I'm not idle enough to look up all the numbers. :-D

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rabbit_39 View Post
                              That is the simple view of efficiency, yes. But in real life, the practical efficiency means what resources are abundant/renewable/being recycled/etc and what's not, and how it's being used.
                              "Bolded up" Agreed, I have to ask though is the renewability/recycling energy efficient or is it costing enery to do it?

                              Originally posted by rabbit_39 View Post
                              In this case, the solar thermal efficiency is high because there is little to no operating cost (in energy or otherwise). The energy to dry the desiccant in this way is essentially "free".

                              A solar furnace can be as simple as a green house with carefully placed vents to remove the moisture via natural convection.
                              Will the solar furnace if operated as simply as a greenhouse reach a sufficient temperature to overcome the "latent heat of vapourisation" of the bonded water along with breaking the "hydrogen bonds" formed between the water and the dessicant?

                              Surely if drying a dessicant out, all humidity must be excluded, so opening vents and allowing airflow through means the dessicant is still in an atmosphere that has water present.

                              I don't know, I am just asking. My only experience is with "Silica Gel" and this must be dried out above 100 C and once dried prevented from coming into atmospheric contact until it is needed. Otherwise it will start absorbing water again straight away, I'm assuming most chemical dessicants will behave in a similar manner, they cannot be turned on and off at the flick of a switch but absorb moisture at a certain rate that is dependent on the atmosphere they are in.

                              Originally posted by rabbit_39 View Post
                              If the energy used for the fans and rotating the desiccant as they're used is supplied by PV solar and the construction of the conditioned area is passively efficient, the operating cost can be darn near zero for close to 10 years.
                              Yes but what is the initial cost of this, the operating cost maybe close to ero for 10 years, I don't know so must accept your word, but "what is the initial cost and how long is the payback time" Nothing is for free, is it?



                              Originally posted by rabbit_39 View Post
                              And no, I'm not idle enough to look up all the numbers. :-D
                              I'm not sure I completely believe that:-) Only joking but I honestly don't blame you for not doing so, when it is only for discussion purposes here :-)

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