Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A blacklist for anything

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • A blacklist for anything

    What are the things to watch out for moving to Jakarta? Shall we start some threads on this to help us be wiser expat.

    It can range to property agent, taxi, shops, online shopping, food, restaurant, housing etc...

    Start rolling.

  • #2
    A blacklist is a bit negative, I would say its better to ask for recommendations.
    Did you try the search function?
    Its not the best, I know, but there are so many first time expats who ask very similar questions repeatedly; maybe you could trawl through them and if you don't find the answers to specific questions, ask those in this thread?

    Things I would have high on my priority list:
    1 finding a place to live as near to my work as possible.
    2 finding a place as far away from a flood area as possible - ideally an apartment above my office
    So my blacklist would be: floods and macet

    As a side note, welcome to the forum & welcome to Indonesia.
    Are you excited? Are you already here?
    Cicak Magnet

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by bad_azz View Post
      A blacklist is a bit negative, I would say its better to ask for recommendations.
      Did you try the search function?
      Its not the best, I know, but there are so many first time expats who ask very similar questions repeatedly; maybe you could trawl through them and if you don't find the answers to specific questions, ask those in this thread?

      Things I would have high on my priority list:
      1 finding a place to live as near to my work as possible.
      2 finding a place as far away from a flood area as possible - ideally an apartment above my office
      So my blacklist would be: floods and macet

      As a side note, welcome to the forum & welcome to Indonesia.
      Are you excited? Are you already here?
      Thanks... Keep rolling

      Comment


      • #4
        I agree with the bad-azz approach. Think positive!

        Roll with the punches, and don't let the little things get you down. Sure, there are plenty of little annoyances here - the fact that people tend to assume all expats are rich and extract higher prices accordingly, for example. But you'll quickly go crazy if you think of those aspects as dreadful. Thing of them as part of the adventure and let them roll right off you - you'll be much happier that way.

        Years ago, when I was new to Jakarta, a long-time expat said to me: "The things that are hard in America are easy here, and the things that are easy in America are hard." This is so true: it's easy here to have a suit tailored, get someone to clean your house, send someone else to pay the electric bill. It's hard (sometimes) to find clothes that fit, explain why you'd prefer a vacuum cleaner to a broom, obtain the electric bill on time. Just remember - it's different here. For every frustration there is a corresponding aspect that is delightful.

        Comment


        • #5
          Without knowing your personal likes and dislikes and an idea of your expectations one really can't honestly answer your question. Someone may dislike something you love and vice versa.
          [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Verdana]Some love to milk Apostate.[/FONT][/COLOR]

          Comment


          • #6
            Things to watch out for? Let me see ...

            Most people around here don't speak English. I know its terribly inconsiderate of the locals, and a pain in the ass to learn, ugh, a foreign language, but committing to memory a few basic phrases, greetings, numbers, time, directions, etc. would help immeasurably and be a good base to build upon, once you arrive.

            Checking out the English language press (Jakarta Post and Jakarta Globe) on-line editions, might be instructive, as well. Getting tuned into the local happenings and issues will make the place seem less, well, foreign.

            Comment


            • #7
              Unlicensed taxis. I took one downtown once from Sukarno-Hatta and even my Indonesian friends were shocked that I risked it. Taxis parked at the airport have to queue and also pay fees to "dispatchers" so they may ask for outrageous rates when you leave the terminal. In the days when I got reimbursed, I would take a Silver Bird which followed the meter strictly (but their meter rate is at least 20% higher). Now I go for the Damri bus just as often.

              Comment

              Working...
              X