Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Odd inconveniences of Ramadan

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by waarmstrong View Post
    Random thought....It struck me as a bit obsurd, or perhaps just odd, to be describing pre-Ramadan Jakarta as "normal." Maybe non-fasting Bandung comes closer to the definition.
    Normal is a matter of where you happen to be at any given moment.

    Comment


    • #17
      Though the influence of Islam in the Minahasa is minimal, Manado itself has an increasing number of Muslim. Some say that the Muslim community account now for about 20% of the total population of the city. The city and region is economically booming and it has attracted over the past ten years a number of migrants coming from other provinces.

      One thing is noticeable in my city is how well the different communities co-exist. We have churches neighboring with masjid or temples and it very rarely creates problem. In fact, in my 16 years here I don't recall having heard of any.

      I like Ramadhan as much as I like Christmas, though I celebrate none of them. During Ramadhan, all shops, bars, clubs...etc remain open and no-one seem to be bothered by it.

      Radicalism certainly exists in both communities (Christian and Muslim) here but they are wise enough to remain discreet. And they'd better do. I have no doubt that the leaders of the two communities would quickly step in and manage (read: administrate the appropriate beatings if calls are unheard) the situation . In Northern Sulawesi we all have families and friends who have been living or been witnesses of the disaster which happened in Poso and in the Maluku when two communities have forgotten the basic recipe to live in harmony.

      Among the many things I like which comes with Ramadhan is the variety of takjil sold pretty much everywhere. I wish Ramadhan would last a year just to be able to indulge in these sweeties more often.

      I have been living almost 16 years in Indonesia and most of my life (I think it is a total of more than 30 years) in developing countries. Very soon Indonesia will be the country I have spent the most time, including my native country. I am therefore pretty used to noise pollution of any sort and Masjid calls don't really disturb me. Anyway, I am generally awake before them. In fact the mass of cars parked in the vicinity of churches anytime there is a mass held, jamming the traffic and creating havoc, are much more of an inconvenience to me. As much as I love Manadonese I have never been able to cop with this irrepressible need they have to take their car or motorbike to go the church even if it is only distant of 50 meters and that they will end up parking at a distance sometimes greater than what their home is.

      Manado is just a 3 hours flight from Jakarta and tickets goes for less than a million (ow). If Ramadhan is an inconvenience, I suggest you to come and have a look at how, in Indonesia, it can be spent without noticing much difference to what the city normally experiences and despite a yearly increasing number of its Muslim population.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by atlantis View Post
        Though the influence of Islam in the Minahasa is minimal, Manado itself has an increasing number of Muslim. Some say that the Muslim community account now for about 20% of the total population of the city. The city and region is economically booming and it has attracted over the past ten years a number of migrants coming from other provinces.

        One thing is noticeable in my city is how well the different communities co-exist. We have churches neighboring with masjid or temples and it very rarely creates problem. In fact, in my 16 years here I don't recall having heard of any.

        I like Ramadhan as much as I like Christmas, though I celebrate none of them. During Ramadhan, all shops, bars, clubs...etc remain open and no-one seem to be bothered by it.

        Radicalism certainly exists in both communities (Christian and Muslim) here but they are wise enough to remain discreet. And they'd better do. I have no doubt that the leaders of the two communities would quickly step in and manage (read: administrate the appropriate beatings if calls are unheard) the situation . In Northern Sulawesi we all have families and friends who have been living or been witnesses of the disaster which happened in Poso and in the Maluku when two communities have forgotten the basic recipe to live in harmony.

        Among the many things I like which comes with Ramadhan is the variety of takjil sold pretty much everywhere. I wish Ramadhan would last a year just to be able to indulge in these sweeties more often.

        I have been living almost 16 years in Indonesia and most of my life (I think it is a total of more than 30 years) in developing countries. Very soon Indonesia will be the country I have spent the most time, including my native country. I am therefore pretty used to noise pollution of any sort and Masjid calls don't really disturb me. Anyway, I am generally awake before them. In fact the mass of cars parked in the vicinity of churches anytime there is a mass held, jamming the traffic and creating havoc, are much more of an inconvenience to me. As much as I love Manadonese I have never been able to cop with this irrepressible need they have to take their car or motorbike to go the church even if it is only distant of 50 meters and that they will end up parking at a distance sometimes greater than what their home is.

        Manado is just a 3 hours flight from Jakarta and tickets goes for less than a million (ow). If Ramadhan is an inconvenience, I suggest you to come and have a look at how, in Indonesia, it can be spent without noticing much difference to what the city normally experiences and despite a yearly increasing number of its Muslim population.
        I think what you say about your region is pretty much true about the whole country. I travel quite a bit (just back from Smrg) and notice what you report about harmony in communities.

        I think you are lucky if you can say the economy there is booming however. This is not true of the whole country. The economy is indeed undergoing quite a deal of structural change which I hope will prove positive into the distant future.

        Comment


        • #19
          I think if the small majority got on with their prayers and didn't worry about what other people are doing it would all work out fine, they should worry about their own souls

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by tihzho View Post
            Its not uncommon to appear to be closed when in fact they're open. Next time go up and double check.

            The sexy dancers aren't staging any protest if that's what you mean. They're not allowed to 'ply their trade' and while I can't speak for all of them they're not happy about it because they're not making money.
            I was referring to the Muslim women in France, who were your example of how Muslims don't understand the concept of majority rule in the West. I'm not sure if I disagree with you or if I too don't accept the majority rule philosophy. I agree with Anglian's statement above and that sums up my current sentiments about Ramadan. Likewise, those women should be able to dress according to their beliefs even if they are a minority.

            Actually, I stand corrected about bars being closed in Bandung. Just received a group text invite to a bar in Braga, which is exactly in the city center.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by atlantis View Post
              Though the influence of Islam in the Minahasa is minimal, Manado itself has an increasing number of Muslim. Some say that the Muslim community account now for about 20% of the total population of the city. The city and region is economically booming and it has attracted over the past ten years a number of migrants coming from other provinces.

              One thing is noticeable in my city is how well the different communities co-exist. We have churches neighboring with masjid or temples and it very rarely creates problem. In fact, in my 16 years here I don't recall having heard of any.

              I like Ramadhan as much as I like Christmas, though I celebrate none of them. During Ramadhan, all shops, bars, clubs...etc remain open and no-one seem to be bothered by it.

              Radicalism certainly exists in both communities (Christian and Muslim) here but they are wise enough to remain discreet. And they'd better do. I have no doubt that the leaders of the two communities would quickly step in and manage (read: administrate the appropriate beatings if calls are unheard) the situation . In Northern Sulawesi we all have families and friends who have been living or been witnesses of the disaster which happened in Poso and in the Maluku when two communities have forgotten the basic recipe to live in harmony.

              Among the many things I like which comes with Ramadhan is the variety of takjil sold pretty much everywhere. I wish Ramadhan would last a year just to be able to indulge in these sweeties more often.

              I have been living almost 16 years in Indonesia and most of my life (I think it is a total of more than 30 years) in developing countries. Very soon Indonesia will be the country I have spent the most time, including my native country. I am therefore pretty used to noise pollution of any sort and Masjid calls don't really disturb me. Anyway, I am generally awake before them. In fact the mass of cars parked in the vicinity of churches anytime there is a mass held, jamming the traffic and creating havoc, are much more of an inconvenience to me. As much as I love Manadonese I have never been able to cop with this irrepressible need they have to take their car or motorbike to go the church even if it is only distant of 50 meters and that they will end up parking at a distance sometimes greater than what their home is.

              Manado is just a 3 hours flight from Jakarta and tickets goes for less than a million (ow). If Ramadhan is an inconvenience, I suggest you to come and have a look at how, in Indonesia, it can be spent without noticing much difference to what the city normally experiences and despite a yearly increasing number of its Muslim population.
              Thanks for the info and perspective. I already plan to visit sometime soon. The city and region sound quite appealing to me.

              Comment


              • #22
                I was hoping other people would share their own stories of culture clash during Ramadan. Come on, don't be shy!

                Comment


                • #23
                  We were in Matahari Kramat Jati last night for fast-breaking. Every eating place was packed to the gills as you might expect. We did our shopping first assuming once the first wave cleared, there would be at least a few vacant tables. Seemed like a good plan up front, but after about 45 minutes to an hour of looking for a bath mat, air freshener and a few other things, the food area was still a zoo. The only place with a empty table or two was the Texas Chicken place. Seems they had fewer patrons for a reason, but that's another story; what I wanted to note was that most fast breakers were accommodating, patient and enjoying themselves in spite of the ever present crunch of people.

                  That is, except for the rotund woman at the counter in front of us. She was berating the servers mercelously, screaming in their faces saying, "Can't you see, I have money; I shouldn't have to put up with this! You should show me the respect I deserve! You people are so [low class, stupid, resentful]!" What she was irate about was the size of the chicken leg place on her tray. The workers replaced it several times, but she would not be appeased and eventually stormed off in a blue huff. The funny part was the leg she ended up with, after a 5 minute rant, was the one first offered, as it was the biggest in the dispensing rack.

                  Not sure if there is a moral, but it seems that Ramadan brings out both the best and the worst in us, or perhaps you might observe that the stress of the holiday reveals one's true nature.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by jason206 View Post
                    I was referring to the Muslim women in France, who were your example of how Muslims don't understand the concept of majority rule in the West. I'm not sure if I disagree with you or if I too don't accept the majority rule philosophy. I agree with Anglian's statement above and that sums up my current sentiments about Ramadan. Likewise, those women should be able to dress according to their beliefs even if they are a minority.

                    Actually, I stand corrected about bars being closed in Bandung. Just received a group text invite to a bar in Braga, which is exactly in the city center.
                    Oh yeah the Muslim protests in France. Well as I said before if someone is bent on living a spiritual life according to their faith don't put yourself in a situation which makes this difficult or impossible. Its common sense...if you don't like the heat stay out of the kitchen.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Jason206, If you live where I seem to remember you do, there is a bar not all that far away selling beer by the pitcher and it is open because I was there on Friday night... drinking beer
                      I will PM you the location
                      Cicak Magnet

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by waarmstrong View Post
                        ..............

                        Not sure if there is a moral, but it seems that Ramadan brings out both the best and the worst in us, or perhaps you might observe that the stress of the holiday reveals one's true nature.
                        I can see this doesn't really fit so well here, but I have always wondered how moslems justify, at Ramadan or otherwise, paying interest on bank loans on their homes and cars.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Jaime C View Post
                          Find a good service that comes to your home.

                          I've been using Solusi Sehat in Jakarta and Bandung for many years. 2 hours usually costs around 180-220k, depending on your area. If you need the phone number, PM me.

                          If you like deep massage, Ibu Yanti and Cinta in Bandung are excellent.
                          Thanks for the referral, Jaime! I just had my first delivery massage, and you are right - they're quite skilled! She found spots I didn't even know were hurting....

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by jason206 View Post
                            Thanks for the referral, Jaime! I just had my first delivery massage, and you are right - they're quite skilled! She found spots I didn't even know were hurting....
                            Glad it worked well for you. The ladies are really nice, and I've never had a bad massage from them yet. What therapist did you have?
                            Sasa Bule is having a bayi!

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Jaime C View Post
                              Glad it worked well for you. The ladies are really nice, and I've never had a bad massage from them yet. What therapist did you have?
                              I think it was Ibu Reza or Reja... Something like that. Your recommendations weren't available.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X