Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Grow from seeds?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Grow from seeds?

    I plan to bring some seeds to Indonesia from US. Does anyone has experience growing plants from seeds that they bring from US or Europe? I would like to hear your success stories.

    Thank you in advance..

  • #2
    I've brought many seeds from France (both flowers and vegetables) but had poor result, apart for varieties such as basil and coriander. My results were much better with any seeds I've bought here. I do grow organically tomatoes, cucumber, buncis, kacang panjang, eggplant, ginger, lemon basil, coriander, mint, curcuma, chile, pak choi, parsley...and a few more.
    I do not live in Jakarta, have space and the perfect soil for it. I've grown a lot of different varieties of tree.
    I have a gardener who takes care of them when I am not here but I organise myself so that I work on it, everyday that I am in Manado. Later this evening I plan to plant 20 more papaya trees and to start new chile and tomatoes plantations.

    Comment


    • #3
      I dont know if that is legal, but my son sent me some tomato seeds, total failure, and my daughter when on holiday in Ireland sent a packet of mixed flower seeds again total failure, My wife on the other hand pinched a cutting from a flowering shrub in Thailand and one in Singapore and they are doing well, Very naughty I know

      Comment


      • #4
        Same here. Seeds I bought at the local toko pupuk I had no problems with: tomato, eggplant, buncis, etc. Some time back I bought (what appeared to be imported) seeds at ACE and had very poor results.

        BTW, Atlantis, where do you get your herb seeds?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by sfmom View Post
          I plan to bring some seeds to Indonesia from US. Does anyone has experience growing plants from seeds that they bring from US or Europe? I would like to hear your success stories.

          Thank you in advance..
          I brought in Douglas Fir from Canada and tried to grow it on the foot of a mountain.
          It grew into a midget Douglas.
          Last edited by Fuamnach; 22-06-10, 21:38.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Gratilla View Post
            BTW, Atlantis, where do you get your herb seeds?
            Parsley, coriander and chive come from France, lemon basil and bramakusu are local (bought the leaves in my pasar, planted and multiplied them).

            Comment


            • #7
              sfmom,
              please make sure that any seeds you bring into Indonesia are non GMO.

              BB

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by BatamBule View Post
                sfmom,
                please make sure that any seeds you bring into Indonesia are non GMO.

                BB
                And why is that?

                Comment


                • #9
                  My failures far outnumber my successes, but here are the successes:

                  lemon grass
                  Indian borage (Plectranthus amboinicus)
                  Sweet potatoes (you can eat the leaves like spinach)
                  basil
                  papaya

                  I've had modest/temporary success with chili peppers, rosemary, and mint. Right now I have some bitter melon growing but it is too early to say if it will flourish.

                  Failures (things that either didn't grow, or grew but then fell prey to pests and diseases or wouldn't fruit) include tomatoes, beans, and squash.

                  All my plants have been grown from seed purchased here or in Singapore, or propagated from cuttings.

                  Tropical agriculture is a whole different matter than gardening in temperate climates. (I used to work at an ag station in the tropics so I picked up a few tips there.) Because it never gets cold, pests and diseases never die off. Hence, it is a year-round battle against snails, grasshoppers, fungus, viral diseases, etc. Further, depending on where you live you may have soil issues (not much around and/or low-quality, possibly contaminated with all kinds of toxins). I've had difficulty finding decent potting soil - it's easy to buy compost that purports to be organic, but you can't use it as a straight-up medium and I've found that even mixed with dirt some of it doesn't seem to work for my seedlings. I make my own compost though, and that's a success.

                  My goal is to keep trying many things until I find a good range of successful herbs and vegetables for a varied garden producing healthful and tasty products. The battle continues!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm so happy for your replied. Thank you so much for sharing your experiences. I really appreciated.

                    @atlantis: wow, you must have a beautiful big garden. I hope one day when I visit Manado, I get the chance to see your garden..

                    @Fuamnach: GMO I think stand for Genetically Modified

                    @Puspawarna: thank you for sharing your story. What stuffs did you put to make compost normally?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      With only a few exceptions, our compost pile is limited to raw fruit and vegetable discards. So, the bulk of it is zucchini stems, broccoli or lettuce that rotted before we ate it (I hate that because I can't stand to waste food, but at least with the compost pile I don't feel the food is totally going to waste!), stems and veins/seeds from capsicums, banana/mango/citrus peels, apple cores, and that sort of thing.

                      The few exceptions include:
                      - While I don't add leaves that fall from the trees on our property because they take too long to compost, we have one of those flame trees and I do add all the flowers that fall from that.
                      - I make coffee using biodegradable filters, so the grounds and filter go in the pile every day.
                      - Eggshells go in, but I have learned to crush them first as they don't break down very fast either. However, I think they are necessary or the compost would most likely be extremely acidic. (I don't pH test, so I'm just guessing.)
                      Once in a great while, I'll throw in a heel from a loaf of homemade bread.

                      I have two piles, actually - one that gets added to, and the other covered with plastic sheeting for hot composting. I turn the hot compost pile 1x/week. The cold pile gets our daily leavings for about three months, then I use the compost from the hot pile (which is generally in pretty good shape after 3 months), cover the cold pile to start a hot compost, and the empty slot becomes the new cold pile.

                      Plants often spring up in the cold pile - usually sweet potatoes, peppers, tomato seeds, and citrus. I've saved a few citrus seedlings (they get established just fine, but some insect or snail devours the leaves so they're not growing much bigger) and tomato plants (that grow but don't set fruit), but I try to ignore the capsicum sprouts, even though my instinct is to try to save them. Sweet peppers are usually quite vulnerable to viral infections, and I've got something in my vicinity that attacks even hot peppers (most likely transmitted by insect bites). If I ever get a variety of chili pepper that seems resistant, perhaps I'll try grafting.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by sfmom View Post
                        @Fuamnach: GMO I think stand for Genetically Modified
                        Yes I'm aware what GMO is. My question to Batam Bule, why he insisted that you don't bring in any GMO seed. Many verified GMO plants, such as FDA approved, are very safe and produce high yield.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          We have had mixed success. Some pomegranate seeds we planted have turned into a mini orchard of 22 plants. Egg plant and zucchini have flourished. My biggest disappointment was sweet corn. Planted in two rows with the local variety, the rodents attacked only the sweet corn and we ended up with nothing. We are still waiting the results of some Haas avocado seeds that sprouted, but too early to tell if they will bear good fruit

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Kimdub View Post
                            Some pomegranate seeds we planted have turned into a mini orchard of 22 plants.t
                            Wow, where did the seeds come from - pomegranates you bought at the grocery store?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Seeds were brought from the states. I had my doubts, but they traveled well in just a small plastic Zip Lock bag.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X