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2nd Camera - micro four thirds?

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  • 2nd Camera - micro four thirds?

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    Have been looking at a good somewhat smaller camera and ended up with a short list with the Fuji X100 or a micro four third like the NEX 5.

    I know some people like El G use the X100 and I was quite impressed with the quality; I learned on DPREVIEW the sensor outperforms the micro 4/3. Almost bought it in Spore (weirdly enough cheaper in Holland Village than Sim Lim).

    I'm just concerned about the impossibility to change lenses; difficult to predict if I will miss that, perhaps you will just work around it?
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    And about the micro 4/3: There will be a [COLOR=#000000][SIZE=2]NEX 7 (wow, 24 MP), would it be worthwhile to wait?[/SIZE]:[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT][COLOR=#000000][FONT=arial][FONT=arial][SIZE=2]http://www.likemobi.com/sneak-peek-n...ex-vg20-15802/
    [/SIZE][/FONT][/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#000000][FONT=arial][FONT=arial]The NEX 5 got upgraded to the 5N. Olympus follows with Pen E-P3, Panasonic and Samsung with NX200 not to be discarded either...[/FONT][/FONT][/COLOR]
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    All thoughts and ideas welcome....[/FONT]
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  • #2
    What is important to you? I think the nex with the pancake will be smaller than the x100. Do you need depth of field? For night shots, it will be close enought in practical uses (web/email share and prints up to 4"x6"). I didn't buy the 4/3rd sensor of any kind because I find the lack of depth of field is enough to deter me. The x100's downfall for me is cost/usage is too high and not quite small enough. But that is just for me. X100 is on my list after I get the other camera (or two) that I wanted.

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    • #3
      All the mirrorless Sony cameras are APS C, so the sensor is slightly bigger than a micro 4/3 Olympus. In general almost any APS C sized sensor and above would outperform the Olympus for noise performance, due to the higher pixel pitch. That includes the APS C sensor in the Fuji, which has a five micron pitch, comparable to some of the budget SLRs from the likes of Nikon and Pentax. With the Nex 7, at 24 million pixels for a pitch of about four microns, Sony is cramming about the same size pixels as micro 4/3 over a larger sensor, and with better noise performance, so it is quite an attractive option at the moment. Having said that the Fuji will edge most of the other cameras for overall image quality and noise performance, due to its sensor. I find using a fixed focal length camera somewhat liberating, in that one doesn't have to worry about switching lenses and it gets the creative juices flowing because of the need to work around the limited focal length to create some good photo opportunities. I have had a look at the EP3 and the focusing speed is phenomenal, and certainly something to consider if you're doing a lot of street shooting. It is on my short list at the moment to be coupled with a 14mm Panasonic fixed lens.

      As for depth of field on micro 4/3 it is entirely possible to get shallow depth provided one is willing to fork out over two grand for one of their pro f2.0 lenses.
      Last edited by lone_ranger; 29-10-11, 14:56.
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      • #4
        Thanks, good feedback.

        Yep, would consider a (limited) DOF rather important.

        Hmm, good tip LR; will look for some comparisons between the NEX and the EP3. Difficult to get 'loaners' nowadays to try them out for a couple of days.

        Just read this Fujifilm X10 preview; seems like a nice little gem (3rd camera? )
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        • #5
          I used the 2.0 on a 4/3. Still not ebough, so not for me

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          • #6
            Found a comparison (hands-on) test Olympus PEN 3 vs Panasonic Lumix GF3 vs Samsung NX11[COLOR=#2D2D2D][FONT=Verdana] [/FONT][/COLOR]vs Sony NEX-5.Not really in-depth but not bad either:

            http://www.ephotozine.com/article/ol...ung-nx11-17084

            Their conclusion:
            The Olympus PEN E-P3, with ultra fast focusing, the quickest switch on time, a great high resolution touch screen, excellent image quality, built in anti-shake that will work with ANY lens, (isn't this the whole point in having an interchangeable lens camera?) and interchangeable grips, is an obvious choice, as the best PEN series camera yet. In fact, it's one of the best mirrorless cameras this year! Therefore it is to be Highly Recommended, and is our Editor's Choice.

            Boke seems okay but still wonder what the real life difference with the X100 would be...does anybody have experience with this and a micro 4/3?
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            • #7
              Jstar: bokeh is a personal choice. I don't own a lens larger than f 2.8. Except my 300 mm zoom just for the reach. You should take two sd cards and try it with the ep (good camera, really) and the x100 or other competitors that you're considering)

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              • #8
                This is fun

                Talking about bokeh...

                http://photojojo.com/store/awesomene...r-thirds-lens/

                [SIZE=4][COLOR=#000000][FONT=georgia]Lo-fi Micro 4/3 Camera Lens[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE]
                [COLOR=#8F8F8F][FONT=georgia]A manual focus lens to give your digital photos creative edge.
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                • #9
                  jstar, I really love my X100. It's quite a liberation to not having to carry my 5d2 and lenses around.

                  I was in the same position as you and about to buy the Olympus EP3 but I ended up getting the Fujifilm X100. I don't regret my choice at all!

                  The great thing about the X100 is that the lens and sensor are coupled very nicely, as in they were designed to work together. Add the fact that it's a fixed focal length lens and you get some really good quality out of it.

                  A word of warning though, it's sometimes a bit tricky to use and the manual focus is useless but it's not really a big deal.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks El_G. I guess it has auto mode for the wife too? Her complaint was that it was a bit bulky.
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                    • #11
                      After the second firmware upgrade for the X100 some critical issues are dealt with. Autofocus is improved and a number of other settings are improved. Whats remaining is I guess for example to make the manual focus mechanic, which can be done by firmware upgrade. I guess there is not so much to do about the slow response (slow autofocus) and the softness of images at f2. I regret buying the camera, and wish I had bought the Ricoh GXR ... which now has a Mount A12 module for fitting of a wide range of lenses.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by N.Rio View Post
                        wish I had bought the Ricoh GXR ... which now has a Mount A12 module for fitting of a wide range of lenses.
                        Interesting, esp. for DOF I guess. But isn't this mount for Leica M lenses only? Don't understand the Ricoh philosophy very well...
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                        • #13
                          I have a Ricoh camera too, and menus and userfriendlyness is pretty much superb. Of course the quality of build is really good too. The main drawback compared to X100 and eg. Olympus PEN is that the electronic viewfinder (external) of the Ricoh camera is not up to those standards.
                          About lenses, from dpreview "The use of the Leica M-mount brings flexibility in two respects. In part because it is no longer under patent, and also thanks to its age, there are a wide range of lenses available for the M-mount. These include Zeiss, Voigtländer, Konica, Minolta and Rollei lenses, as well as native Leica designs."
                          Full review here: http://www.dpreview.com/previews/ricohgxrmounta12/

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jstar View Post
                            Thanks El_G. I guess it has auto mode for the wife too? Her complaint was that it was a bit bulky.
                            Yes it has an auto mode but I must advise you that this camera is targeted at people who already have a good understanding of photography. However, it is possible for you to setup the camera in a way that it's pretty much ready to shoot:
                            - Set the aperture ring to A
                            - Set the shutter speed dial to A
                            - Set Auto ISO (you can choose the max ISO setting - eg ISO 3200 gives excellent performance - as well as the minimum shutter speed - eg 1/20s to avoid camera shake)
                            - Set the AF to multipoint

                            Originally posted by N.Rio View Post
                            After the second firmware upgrade for the X100 some critical issues are dealt with. Autofocus is improved and a number of other settings are improved. Whats remaining is I guess for example to make the manual focus mechanic, which can be done by firmware upgrade. I guess there is not so much to do about the slow response (slow autofocus) and the softness of images at f2. I regret buying the camera, and wish I had bought the Ricoh GXR ... which now has a Mount A12 module for fitting of a wide range of lenses.
                            About the softness at f2, it's not that bad. And moreover, no lens is made to perform at its best on the widest aperture. Close down to f2.8 or f4, and you'll get blown away by the sharpness.

                            About the M-mount lenses: I'm not an expert but aren't Leica lenses crazy expensive?

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                            • #15
                              Quote: About the M-mount lenses: I'm not an expert but aren't Leica lenses crazy expensive?
                              Yep, that's what I thought too. But reading the mount specs it seems you can use other lenses as well.

                              I kind of get the Ricoh idea but don't know if it will ever be a success: so they have a module which includes the sensor and the lens. It's dust free and supposed to be a better integrated package. And when new and better sensors come out or there are other lenses you want, you buy a new module. So far so good. But why would you prefer this over a micro 4/3 or the X100? Sensor is the same as the micros. It also seems rather expensive: GXR body for $400, module for $700. So that will add up.

                              If you have Leica lenses lying around, I would understand. But even so: then you want the best of the best and have probably quite some money to spend so you might consider the full frame M9-P, right?
                              Last edited by jstar; 31-10-11, 23:53. Reason: prices were wrong
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