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Canon or Nikon for Entry level DSLR?

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  • #61
    Here's a tip. If you under-expose under poor (i.e. little) light, you will get noise when you push the picture to the proper lighting levels in post-processing (i.e. Photoshop). It is very important to avoid underexposure in low light. Use the histogram.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by beebop View Post
      If thats the case then no camera will ever satisfy me. I will have to get rich and move up to medium format. i have never tried L glass so hopefully that will sort things out when i do. I have a tamron 17-50 f/2.8 non vc. I bought it on the grounds that people said it was L glass quality or atleast very near to it. Hope thats not the case.
      Originally posted by Hombre de Maiz View Post
      Here's a tip. If you under-expose under poor (i.e. little) light, you will get noise when you push the picture to the proper lighting levels in post-processing (i.e. Photoshop). It is very important to avoid underexposure in low light. Use the histogram.
      I know what I am talking about. People in phtoography forum were trying to convince me that I did mistake technically. I did D40 & 350D, and many other trials of canon & nikon DSLR (I forget each specific cameras ), and a friend of mine also agreed to the conclusion when I gave him the camera and let him explore. I am a user and I've got to have a pic in low light, so I just care about the proof. I always go back to Canon to shoot in the dark, and Nikon for the days when there's sufficient light. IF it's landscape, I love Nikon color. Green in Canon result gives me headache.
      Last edited by Kuntarini; 12-03-11, 13:27.



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      • #63
        I am not disagreeing with you, Kunta. My observation/tip applies to all sensors. I'm sure you've heard of "exposing to the right". This becomes crucial under low lighting...

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        • #64
          Originally posted by Hombre de Maiz View Post
          I am not disagreeing with you, Kunta. My observation/tip applies to all sensors. I'm sure you've heard of "exposing to the right". This becomes crucial under low lighting...
          Sure. I do manual, dont worry.

          Thanks for the tip...... I never use photoshop. I only use photoshop to correct horizon & give signature. To brighten the result, I just use Microsoft Editor, but it's very rare. Sometimes I push the exposure with the victim of granny pic, but I dont need to brighten it again later on. That's bad.... I will have to use your tip and correct brightness later on
          Last edited by Kuntarini; 12-03-11, 13:13.



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          • #65
            Expose to the right. Im not sure if im doing this correctly but what i know is you got to be careful of blown out highlights. Those are not as easy to recover as the left side of the histogram. The camera does have a nice 'blown out highlights' warning which will blink overexposed areas. I usually get withing a hair of that. I also find that adobe camera raw does a pretty darn good job of removing noise but there is a sacrifice of sharpness which i hate so much.

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            • #66
              If you shoot manual or have some time to process the scene technically, do a zone method exposure. This of course require that you know the lattitude of your sensor's sensitivity. let the shadows become black in the values you don't care to have any information on and let the hightlights get blown out where you don't care for any details.

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              • #67
                Was in the cinema yesterday and saw a trailer of Broken City with Mark Wahlberg and an Olympus E-5. Finally not a Nikon or Canon.




                Talking about product placement....but seems a good movie though.
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