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  • Miso Paste

    I realize this is oddly specific, but I am having some difficulty finding miso paste. I've got some recipe ideas for it and am itching to try them. I'm wondering if there is perhaps a name for it in Bahasa that I am unaware of? I've tried translating it, but to no avail. Anyone know of a name for it? Or maybe where I can purchase some? I live in North Jakarta.

  • #2
    Not sure what kind of Miso you are after but I just did a bit of a google & found Hatcho Miso which is black & made from soy bean & sea salt (tastes like very strong Vegemite) .... I seem to be having trouble going any further than the google search page which says that in Indonesia Hatcho Miso is either called tautjo or tuaco.
    Last edited by macvert; 23-05-15, 22:03.
    The answer is 42 .... any questions? .

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    • #3
      You can get it from Lottemart, Fresh Farmer and the like.
      They have a section for korean/japanese food.
      Or you can go to this Japanese mini market in Citywalk in Central Jkt.

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      • #4
        Papaya supermarket. There is one in Tarogong. I believe Sogo Foodhall has it too.

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        • #5
          Just on Hatcho Miso - The only food I ever used Hatcho Miso in was plain vegetable soup with no salt added during the cooking process. The Hatcho miso was added to the bowl just before eating because if cooked it will lose it's goodness.
          Hatcho miso gives you an incredible energy boost if you use the right amount & I found 1 heaped-high desert-spoon would do the trick. I would eat it when I came home from work at about 5pm on afternoons before playing night football because it takes about 1 hour to kick in & lasts for hours. If I ate it too late I'd have trouble sleeping that night.
          The answer is 42 .... any questions? .

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          • #6
            I think of tauco as "Indonesian miso." Of course if you want a particular kind of miso, and the tauco is not similar, it won't work. But in some circumstances it is a reasonable substitute.

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            • #7
              I see tauco more as "Chinese Indonesian". When I have come across it, it has always been in this context. To my mind there is a divide between Indonesian, Pure Chinese and Chinese Indonesian meals found here. My preference is strongly towards the first. (I realize that this classification is simplistic.)
              Last edited by johntap; 24-05-15, 14:30.

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              • #8
                Yeah, quite some ramen places use the tauc(h)u instead of miso.
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                • #9
                  If you're going to make Japanese food, for goodness' sake, don't use Indonesian tauco. It will ruin the whole dish. If you live near Kelapa Gading, you can find Japanese miso paste at Food Hall, Mal Kelapa Gading. Pay attention to the label. Japanese miso paste ranges from light to dark. The darker the colour, the longer it's been fermented and it's saltier. Light miso (shiro miso or white miso) is used for soups, dressings and marinades for fish. Dark miso (aka miso or red miso) is used for hearty soup (such as ramen broth) and marinades for meat and poultry.
                  [FONT=comic sans ms]Please excuse my poor English. [/FONT]

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Chotto Matte View Post
                    If you're going to make Japanese food, for goodness' sake, don't use Indonesian tauco.[COLOR=#333333] It will ruin the whole dish.[/COLOR]
                    Don't worry, I never make Japanese food! I just use miso or tauco in other things. It can be a good addition to stirfry.

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                    • #11
                      Found some! I have noticed that my local grocery store consistently has some good looking mackerel filets and it has inspired me to play around a bit. I love the flavor of miso, but have never actually cooked with it, so I'm excited to give this a go. The pack I found is quite large, too, so it should keep me busy for awhile. Thanks for the input, everyone

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                      • #12
                        there's a korean grocer in Lippo Karawaci (taman sari), you can get korean miso/daengjang (its pretty much the same like japanese miso, just has chunkier texture) .....and no dont use tauco....they are completely diff.
                        failing fast or recover fast? Going AGILE.....

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                        • #13
                          Japanese miso and Korean doenjang are not exactly the same. Japanese miso is smoother in texture and doenjang packs more punch or intense. The ingredients in Japanese miso consist of soybean, barley, buckwheat, etc. while doenjang is filled with various flavourings such as anchovies, shrimps, chilli, garlic, etc. If you want to cook authentic Japanese food, use Japanese miso only and if you want to cook authentic Korean food, use doenjang. But if you just want a tasty dish, you can use either.

                          I'm sure you can find doenjang at any Carrefour and Mu Gung Hwa (Korean supermarket) at Kelapa Gading, Kebayoran Baru, Karawaci and Cikarang. The latter sells more variety of doenjang.
                          [FONT=comic sans ms]Please excuse my poor English. [/FONT]

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Chotto Matte View Post
                            Japanese miso and Korean doenjang are not exactly the same. Japanese miso is smoother in texture and doenjang packs more punch or intense. The ingredients in Japanese miso consist of soybean, barley, buckwheat, etc. while doenjang is filled with various flavourings such as anchovies, shrimps, chilli, garlic, etc. If you want to cook authentic Japanese food, use Japanese miso only and if you want to cook authentic Korean food, use doenjang. But if you just want a tasty dish, you can use either.

                            I'm sure you can find doenjang at any Carrefour and Mu Gung Hwa (Korean supermarket) at Kelapa Gading, Kebayoran Baru, Karawaci and Cikarang. The latter sells more variety of doenjang.
                            This is really educational! I never heard of doenjang before, but it sounds delicious. I will have to try it.

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                            • #15
                              In fact every Asian country has its own version of fermented (soy)beans. And I disagree with; you should only use this or that for such a cuisine. Trial and error is always cool in cooking. Do also try douchi btw, originally from the Szechuan kitchen...nice with fish.
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