Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Common foods and drinks?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Common foods and drinks?

    I know it is such a "simple" question but I still want to ask it:
    What are the common foods and drinks in Indonesia? I'd like to know the family foods and drinks in particular.
    Thank you!

  • #2
    Will there be a new thread on what kind of air they have in Jakarta, next? (Answer: smoggy)

    Food types: tofu, rice, noodles, satays. More rice, noodle and veggie based. Not so much meat. You can still find all the western places, KFC, Pizza Hut, McD's.
    Sasa Bule is having a bayi!

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah, it could be a good thread. Why didn't I think about it before? Thank you for the idea!

      By the way, I knew it was stupid to ask but I just wanted to know a bit of it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Some pointers:

        http://www.livinginindonesiaforum.or...ndonesian-food

        Comment


        • #5
          El_Goretto, you're always the best.

          Comment


          • #6
            I think the list of Indonesian foods would be really general if you didn't include regional differences, and much too long if you did. For example, soto - soup, if you just said soto, it would be like saying Americans eat soup... yep, we do (doesn't everyone?). But, it actually seems like you could come up with tens of different types of soto eaten across the country, or likely at least one per ethnic group. The differences might be base ingredients, or even just seasonings, but it's still going to have a different name (I guess like the difference between an "Italian" and "English" chicken soup.

            Not meaning to rain on your parade, just that seems like seasoning preferences follow ethic/regional lines to a large enough extent that the info you get is going to be mostly applicable to the area you are living in (even the name of that food). Other than that, I'd say you will find most types of foods (stir fried/sauteed/boiled/etc vegetables), with the exclusion of baked goods.

            Wow, this post is sucking. Sorry for not being more helpful, just seems like it would be an endless & detailed or short & pointless list. My workers usually have rice, some sort of sauteed vegetable and some sort of fried protein for lunch. If I left the maid to her own devices, I would likely have the same at home most of the time.

            Comment


            • #7
              Yeah, maybe my question was a bit too... general. But yeah, I got it. Thank you, Happyman!

              Comment


              • #8
                Rice. Tofu. Rice. Noodles. Rice.

                Everything above Fried.

                Chilis.


                Most that I know tend to cook the hell out of meat. Rare is not usually in the vocabulary.

                Youtube has a lot of Indonesian reseps. I like this channel because of the English subtitles. If you have Asian markets around you, you can try making many of the recipes for yourself.

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1tDBG0b53cw

                Comment


                • #9
                  Across Indonesia's 6,000 inhabited islands there is a variety of cuisine to suit even the most eclectic of tastes. Over the centuries, traders, pirates and adventurers were attracted to the region due to its prime location on the trade route and its botanical resources. The main attraction was the vast array of spices that grew in the area. Many cultures valued these highly for their healing properties, trade value, scents, and their ability to disguise tastes in food.

                  Indonesian cuisine varies between regions and islands. As it has been influenced heavily by Indian, Middle Eastern, Chinese and European involvement in the islands over the years, Indonesia doesn't have a single 'Indonesian' cuisine but has regional variations, formed by local cultures and differing outside influences. Food is usually fried or stewed and accompanied by a variety of sauces.

                  With over 17,000 fertile islands and a population of over 235 million, Indonesia is home to a great variety of fresh fish, vegetables, spices, rice, chilli and fruit. All of these items are evident in abundance in the rich and varied cuisine of the country. Hindu or Buddhist areas of the country have foods that include ingredients such as cumin, coriander, caraway and ginger. Food in areas that were converted to Islam by Middle-Eastern traders typically contain dill and fennel.

                  Indonesian food is usually prepared in the morning and laid out on the table to be consumed by the family as the need arises throughout the day. Usually taken as snacks, most Indonesian meals are eaten quickly and practically. The exception to this is during festivals, when elaborate food is prepared and eaten communally making for a more special occasion.

                  As a predominantly Islamic country, a characteristic of Indonesian food is the use of halal meats in its preparation.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Haha. Good one, Bestellen!

                    http://indonesia.angloinfo.com/lifes...ood-and-drink/

                    [FONT=arial black]
                    [/FONT]

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yeah, claiming someone elses work for your own deserves a thumbs up?
                      Sasa Bule is having a bayi!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        No but I see it as a very cynical anti spoon feeding statement; like if you would have used uncle Google, this would be the result.
                        [FONT=arial black]
                        [/FONT]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jstar View Post
                          No but I see it as a very cynical anti spoon feeding statement; like if you would have used uncle Google, this would be the result.
                          Some online forums will suspend you for copy and pasting such a big portion of a website without giving credit, or being the original author.
                          Sasa Bule is having a bayi!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            "Everything tastes better with Teh Botol"

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X