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  • Question About working in Indonesia

    Hello Everyone,

    First I'd like to apologize if this is the wrong area to post my question.

    I am wanting to start working in Indonesia, but I am not familiar with the laws in doing so. I will provide some background information in the hopes someone here might be able to tell me definitively whether I can or can't work here yet.

    I've been living in Indonesia for close to 2 years now. I am married with an Indonesian woman and she sponsored me, so I am here on a KITAS. I am still attending my state university in the US online via stream and haven't completed my bachelors degree yet. I'm not sure if this helps, but I am going to be getting my degree in International Business.

    Am I able to get a job in my current situation? Or is it necessary for an employer to file for a work permit/visa for me? Is finishing my degree prior to finding work an absolute necessity?

    I've been sitting at home for 2 years now and am dying to find employment and get out of the house.

    I really appreciate any information you're able to give me.

  • #2
    Yes you can work .
    Maybe you could do an online TEFL or something that will help you to understand the mechanics of teaching & tutor English/ Business English privately.
    Or become a freelance consultant in your field. Or have your wife open a business and work in it with her.

    When you want to start working on a contract for a big company - then that is where it starts to get complicated.
    Re work permits and such - even though you are technically not a TKA (here in Indonesia for work) the Ministry of manpower (DepNakerTrans) will want you to have the permit (IMTA) because there is money in it for them ( 100 dollars a month ) - technically you do not fit the bill for the work permit... all grey areas and muddy.
    Cicak Magnet

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    • #3
      Hi GBP,

      This is my work of specialisation as an immigration agent and translation provider. You can still work but you must have IMTA - a work permit, although you are paid or not.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by linguatranslator View Post
        Hi GBP,

        This is my work of specialisation as an immigration agent and translation provider. You can still work but you must have IMTA - a work permit, although you are paid or not.
        But the law is different for people married to an Indonesian, is it not? It's my understanding that the law allows work by foreign spouses, but since the implementing regulations have never been issued, it is - as bad_azz says, a "grey area." Certainly work in the informal sector, freelancing, or on-line should not be a problem at all.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Puspawarna View Post
          But the law is different for people married to an Indonesian, is it not? It's my understanding that the law allows work by foreign spouses, but since the implementing regulations have never been issued, it is - as bad_azz says, a "grey area." Certainly work in the informal sector, freelancing, or on-line should not be a problem at all.
          I appreciate all of the info. Maybe I'll just continue looking around to see if anything g comes up and try to rush on finishing my degree so I have more opportunities available to me

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          • #6
            Originally posted by GBPack52 View Post
            Am I able to get a job in my current situation? Or is it necessary for an employer to file for a work permit/visa for me? Is finishing my degree prior to finding work an absolute necessity?
            This is not a grey area at all. Yes, the company hiring you will need to do all the efforts which are necessary to hire a foreigner and have the paperwork ready.

            Since officially you need to have experience of 5 years, even after finishing your degree it could be very difficult. Having said that, what is better against boredom than studying and get your degree? At least you have a goal.

            About that whole informal work, we need to be careful not to have the pendulum swing to the other side just based on one little sentence. This is something I said in another thread and I still stand behind it:

            [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Verdana]The law still stands; an Indonesian individual can not hire a foreigner and for an Indonesian company to hire a foreigner, they need written approval. (I.e. IMTA for a PT.) And a foreigner can only work for an Indonesian company in the country, not for a foreign entity.[/FONT][/COLOR]

            [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Verdana]But there is a law (call it loophole if you want) that people are entitled to provide for their family. If you take that one step further, providing means making money, so working in fact.[/FONT][/COLOR]

            [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Verdana]What is left then? Well, the informal sector. So, unregulated like working for yourself. And assisting a CV, owned by your spouse? I have never seen CV's getting IMTA's so they can't officially hire the WNA. But, one could argue that a WNI spouse making good money, does not not need a WNA to provide for her or their children. And 'working for yourself' is also a grey area, especially as consultant or so (flipping burgers on a kaki lima could be different) since theoretically you need to invoice someone if you provide services. And a company using your services could be accused of circumventing the employing a WNA rule. [/FONT][/COLOR]

            [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Verdana]It would be interesting if this is [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#417394][FONT=Verdana]tested[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#333333][FONT=Verdana] in [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#417394][FONT=Verdana]court[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#333333][FONT=Verdana]. But I would not like to be the one.[/FONT][/COLOR]
            Last edited by jstar; 25-02-16, 10:06. Reason: informal work
            [FONT=arial black]
            [/FONT]

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            • #7
              Originally posted by GBPack52 View Post

              Am I able to get a job in my current situation? Or is it necessary for an employer to file for a work permit/visa for me? Is finishing my degree prior to finding work an absolute necessity?

              I've been sitting at home for 2 years now and am dying to find employment and get out of the house.

              I really appreciate any information you're able to give me.
              1. I don't think you can get a job (I am talking here about real job with working permit) without higher education degree and a min. 5 years of experience in your field. I think those are the requirements to get the working permit. But let's assume you already have those two things (education + experience) you still may find Indonesian job market as a though one for expat to get a job.

              2. Yes the employer will still have to pay your working permit.

              3. I have not seen any job adverts where they (employers) don't require higher education degree. Most (if not all) the jobs where expat can work required min Bachelors degree + some experience.

              I do really feel your pain at staying at home and being unable to work.

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              • #8
                However ... there are alternatives to the traditional 9-5.
                Remote working / freelance would be the easiest route for you to take- if it is just some activity you need to stop the stagnation.

                Other options to throw into the mix (I do not know anything about you or your interests / abilities/ location etc.

                Some type of home industry- are you creative?
                Painting- paint & sell your work?
                Cooking/ baking - again make a product & sell it.
                Music- can you play any instruments? Find a band & go play with them.

                The above suggestions won't make you a fortune but will bring in some cash & give you an outlet for your boredom.
                Perhaps you & your wife could rent a small place and open a warung?
                Open a homestay?
                Offer orientation to newcomers to the country?
                I don't think there would be any problems with any of these suggestions in the eyes of the law.
                Last edited by bad_azz; 25-02-16, 12:33.
                Cicak Magnet

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