Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Indonesia Weighs Controversial New Drug Penalties

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Indonesia Weighs Controversial New Drug Penalties

    http://http://www.aljazeera.com/inde...064109348.html

    Following the logic of the Steppenwolf song "(God damn) The Pusher", I vote for feeding the pushers and traffickers to the crocs and putting users in mandatory rehab programs with follow-up.

    As many as 70 % of all those incarcerated in Indonesia are there for drug=related offenses? Sounds a lot like the US, where we are definitely not winning the war on drugs.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Warden: "What we got here ... is failure to communicate."

    The Dude: "Oh yeah? Well that's just, like, your opinion, man."[/FONT]

  • #2
    Originally posted by Mister Bule View Post
    http://http://www.aljazeera.com/inde...064109348.html

    Following the logic of the Steppenwolf song "(God damn) The Pusher", I vote for feeding the pushers and traffickers to the crocs and putting users in mandatory rehab programs with follow-up.

    As many as 70 % of all those incarcerated in Indonesia are there for drug=related offenses? Sounds a lot like the US, where we are definitely not winning the war on drugs.
    Well said, Mister Bule. I have such a love/hate relationship with the incarceration stats in the US for drug-related crimes. Love because it shows the utter failure of an endeavor which was half-baked and doomed from the start. Hate because it adversely affects so many people for something so relatively meaningless. I remember hearing a stat awhile back on how many prisons in the US are privately owned. I can't remember off the top of my head, but it was a staggering percentage. Much like privately owned hotels, it behooves them to keep their "rooms" full.

    I personally don't believe in the death penalty for drug related offenses. I believe there should, as you say, be rehab programs with follow up as well as skills-based education programs to help reintegrate convicted criminals back into society (minor drug related offenses, that is). Here in Indonesia, from what I understand, is much like the states in that many of those in prison on drug-related charges are there as consumers, not suppliers. Obviously there must be a line drawn and harsher punishments for suppliers of hard, addictive drugs, but your average user should be given a chance a rehabilitation and reintegration.

    I know Indonesia has some draconian policies, but feeding drug suppliers their own narcotics until they die is rather excessive. I doubt (or at least I hope) this isn't the sort of image of themselves they wish to portray to the global community.

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't use drugs but from what I understand many addicts also supply drugs as a means of maintaining their habit. Harsher penalties for supplies would scoop up an awful lot of users or addicts who are victims of the whole ugly business.
      Harsh penalties is an easy and lazy way out for governments and law enforcement. As with private prisons there are a lot of people who have a vested interest in maintaining the "war on drugs"

      Comment


      • #4
        Define drugs - After all comparing crack, meth and smack to weed or ecstasy is pretty stupid as they aren't even in the same ball park. After all who hasn't smoked some weed or dropped an E at some point in their life ?? I think the Americans have now realized this with the recent legalization of taxable cannabis sales in some states. The states dollar revenue has shot up, the crime level has statistically dropped, and dunkin donuts are doing a roaring trade - so what's the harm ??

        Compared to the misery caused by alcohol - give me weed any day of the week.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ScooterIndo View Post
          Define drugs - After all comparing crack, meth and smack to weed or ecstasy is pretty stupid as they aren't even in the same ball park. After all who hasn't smoked some weed or dropped an E at some point in their life ?? I think the Americans have now realized this with the recent legalization of taxable cannabis sales in some states. The states dollar revenue has shot up, the crime level has statistically dropped, and dunkin donuts are doing a roaring trade - so what's the harm ??

          Compared to the misery caused by alcohol - give me weed any day of the week.
          *Cough* wait... *Cough* what, bro?

          Jokes aside, yes, it has done a lot of good for many of the states that have legalized it. One of my good friends is from Colorado and he was explaining how a large chunk of the tax money goes right back into state education. Pretty cool. It appears to be a situation where the rest of the country is watching how it plays out in the few states that have passed recreational marijuana laws and seeing if it is feasible for their state. Only time will tell, but I believe there will be more of a domino effect to come.

          And it certainly won't cause anywhere near the amount of issues that alcohol does. As ScooterIndo pointed out, Dunkin' Donuts is on the up-and-up

          As for Indonesia, while I don't see them doing anything even close to this anytime in the foreseeable future, it would be nice to see more emphasis placed on programs to properly rehabilitate and reintegrate true addicts. Rather than just locking them up for unreasonably long sentences, give them an opportunity to become a more productive member of society. Slamming someone away for marijuana possession is just a bit nuts. Actual drugs, on the other hand, are a different story... there is a body count involved with those.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Bule lapar View Post
            *Cough* wait... *Cough* what, bro?

            Jokes aside, yes, it has done a lot of good for many of the states that have legalized it. One of my good friends is from Colorado and he was explaining how a large chunk of the tax money goes right back into state education. Pretty cool. It appears to be a situation where the rest of the country is watching how it plays out in the few states that have passed recreational marijuana laws and seeing if it is feasible for their state. Only time will tell, but I believe there will be more of a domino effect to come.

            And it certainly won't cause anywhere near the amount of issues that alcohol does. As ScooterIndo pointed out, Dunkin' Donuts is on the up-and-up

            As for Indonesia, while I don't see them doing anything even close to this anytime in the foreseeable future, it would be nice to see more emphasis placed on programs to properly rehabilitate and reintegrate true addicts. Rather than just locking them up for unreasonably long sentences, give them an opportunity to become a more productive member of society. Slamming someone away for marijuana possession is just a bit nuts. Actual drugs, on the other hand, are a different story... there is a body count involved with those.

            Hi bule Lapar,
            actually Indonesian Police policy for drug users are to sent them to drug therapy centres.
            It depends on the amount/weight of the drugs the user was caught with. If it pass certain threshold in weights, the police could charge the user as drug dealers.

            for recidivist drug dealers, often the police will just shot them dead for "resisting arrests".

            Big problems now are drug dealers controlling the trade from inside prison. that is what BNN(indo's DEA) trying to end, by moving drug dealers to special prison on remote island guarded by dogs and crocodiles

            BNN should focus on reducing demand side, to reduce the drug trade...

            Best regards,

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by fransgg View Post
              Hi bule Lapar,
              actually Indonesian Police policy for drug users are to sent them to drug therapy centres.
              It depends on the amount/weight of the drugs the user was caught with. If it pass certain threshold in weights, the police could charge the user as drug dealers.

              for recidivist drug dealers, often the police will just shot them dead for "resisting arrests".

              Big problems now are drug dealers controlling the trade from inside prison. that is what BNN(indo's DEA) trying to end, by moving drug dealers to special prison on remote island guarded by dogs and crocodiles

              BNN should focus on reducing demand side, to reduce the drug trade...

              Best regards,
              Like Scoot, I am also more interested in discussing the "lighter" drugs side of this topic.

              If we are talking about reducing the demand for weed, how would that work? What are they going to offer people that is better than getting an illicit high? Is there some sort of alternative? Should they make beer easier to buy? Know I'm being a bit silly, but so is the idea that you can "curb the demand" for drugs, especially among the youth, always full of optimism that they will get away with what they see as a small (victim-less) crime. Really, how are they going to do that?

              America has had it's war on drugs going for a long time (40 odd years). America spends $41.3 billion on policing drugs and incarcerating offenders... every year. In spite of that fact, almost half of the adult population reports having tried marijuana. I'm not saying Indonesia can't come up with a policy that will be more effective, but what is it?
              Last edited by Happyman; 05-03-16, 15:14.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Happyman View Post
                Like Scoot, I am also more interested in discussing the "lighter" drugs side of this topic.

                If we are talking about reducing the demand for weed, how would that work? What are they going to offer people that is better than getting an illicit high? Is there some sort of alternative? Should they make beer easier to buy? Know I'm being a bit silly, but so is the idea that you can "curb the demand" for drugs, especially among the youth, always full of optimism that they will get away with what they see as a small (victim-less) crime. Really, how are they going to do that?

                America has had it's war on drugs going for a long time (40 odd years). America spends $41.3 billion on policing drugs and incarcerating offenders... every year. In spite of that fact, almost half of the adult population reports having tried marijuana. I'm not saying Indonesia can't come up with a policy that will be more effective, but what is it?
                Hi Happyman,

                while in US smoking weeds is kind a cultural thing to do..., a rite of passage for teenagers/young adults.
                In Indonesia, weeds user its not as wide spread as in US.

                I was thinking about drugs education to teenagers, the effects and and risks of using the drugs... especially very addictive drugs such as heroins, cracks... or dangerous ones such bath salts.
                Hopefully the drug educations class might reduce the teenagers interests trying Drugs... since they have more knowledges of drug use and its risks.

                But, I do agree in the long term solutions for Drugs should be legalising certain lighter drugs such weeds...
                but it will take some times to be politically feasible in Indonesia.
                I think if the legalising drug in the US policy works, then, many countries will follow...

                there is an articles from the economist magazine about legalising drug. I think its the best solutions.
                http://www.economist.com/node/13237193


                Best regards,

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bule lapar View Post
                  Well said, Mister Bule. I have such a love/hate relationship with the incarceration stats in the US for drug-related crimes. Love because it shows the utter failure of an endeavor which was half-baked and doomed from the start. Hate because it adversely affects so many people for something so relatively meaningless. I remember hearing a stat awhile back on how many prisons in the US are privately owned. I can't remember off the top of my head, but it was a staggering percentage. Much like privately owned hotels, it behooves them to keep their "rooms" full.

                  I personally don't believe in the death penalty for drug related offenses. I believe there should, as you say, be rehab programs with follow up as well as skills-based education programs to help reintegrate convicted criminals back into society (minor drug related offenses, that is). Here in Indonesia, from what I understand, is much like the states in that many of those in prison on drug-related charges are there as consumers, not suppliers. Obviously there must be a line drawn and harsher punishments for suppliers of hard, addictive drugs, but your average user should be given a chance a rehabilitation and reintegration.

                  I know Indonesia has some draconian policies, but feeding drug suppliers their own narcotics until they die is rather excessive. I doubt (or at least I hope) this isn't the sort of image of themselves they wish to portray to the global community.
                  There is absolutely no doubt that prisons and incarceration of citizens has become a big business industry in the USA, and that a circular effect of lobbyists, legislators and courts has kept it turning like a hamster in a wheel (in a cage).

                  Further I agree that huge resources have been and still are spent on charging, convicting and housing prisoners for relatively minor drug offenses (simple possession / consumption).

                  I have been opposed to the death penalty for decades. I still am, because of the faulty and unfairly applied justice system (still talking about the US primarily here, though it is even far worse in many other countries, and Indonesia's criminal justice system certainly seems to be -ahem- far from pristine and perfect -ahem- ), and because of the number of executed persons later proven wrongly convicted, death row inmates exonerated and set free, etc.

                  But if a system could be trusted to (ahem) "weed out" the innocent (or the simply not proven guilty), I would support the death penalty for some crimes, including for big-time narcotics traffickers.

                  You should think about the amount of damage and destruction of human life that really results from addictive, "body drugs" like heroin, meth and even cocaine. Countless lives and families are destroyed, and victims die horrible deaths just from looking to feel good and escape the reality of their lives for a time .. lives which are inevitably made more and more untenable and unlivable by their continued addictions.Not to mention the horrific violence and nymber of homicides associated with drug trafficking and drug cartels worldwide, often claiming the lives of those not even remotely involved. If you ask the Indonesian government why they execute drug smugglers and traffickers, they will tell you this is the reason. It is not simply the "I am a wrathful god" act of vengeance for what is prohibited.

                  No, I don't personally have a problem, if they can be known to be correctly convicted, with feeding traffickers to the crocs or sharks or feeding them their own drugs until they die, because they have contributed to countless deaths by their choices and actions.
                  Last edited by Mister Bule; 05-03-16, 16:33.
                  [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Warden: "What we got here ... is failure to communicate."

                  The Dude: "Oh yeah? Well that's just, like, your opinion, man."[/FONT]

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by fransgg View Post
                    Hi Happyman,

                    while in US smoking weeds is kind a cultural thing to do..., a rite of passage for teenagers/young adults.
                    In Indonesia, weeds user its not as wide spread as in US.

                    I was thinking about drugs education to teenagers, the effects and and risks of using the drugs... especially very addictive drugs such as heroins, cracks... or dangerous ones such bath salts.
                    Hopefully the drug educations class might reduce the teenagers interests trying Drugs... since they have more knowledges of drug use and its risks.

                    But, I do agree in the long term solutions for Drugs should be legalising certain lighter drugs such weeds...
                    but it will take some times to be politically feasible in Indonesia.
                    I think if the legalising drug in the US policy works, then, many countries will follow...

                    there is an articles from the economist magazine about legalising drug. I think its the best solutions.
                    http://www.economist.com/node/13237193


                    Best regards,
                    I feel a bit embarrassed cause you just sited me the drug policy I would want enacted, in response to my "well whatcha' gonna' do" spiel. Must admit, I incorrectly assumed you were going to come in a bit more on the "oldschool" side. Well said.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The drug trade is just like the sex industry - both are (technically) illegal but they are both multi billion dollar industries that cant and wont ever be stopped as there are simply too many people (including the police and judiciary) making too much money out of them both. As long as people have a desire to get high or get laid neither will vanish anytime soon.

                      Even in "conservative" Indonesia its quite possible to pick up the phone anytime of the day or night and have a hooker on your doorstep half an hour later with a little bag of "something nice" to help enhance your evening.

                      As long as there is a demand there will be a supply. That's a cold hard fact that the Americans and some European countries have already recognized and have decided that legislation/decriminalization, taxation, and overall management of both these industries is the way to go rather than wasting their efforts trying to stop it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by fransgg View Post
                        Hi bule Lapar,
                        actually Indonesian Police policy for drug users are to sent them to drug therapy centres.
                        It depends on the amount/weight of the drugs the user was caught with. If it pass certain threshold in weights, the police could charge the user as drug dealers.

                        for recidivist drug dealers, often the police will just shot them dead for "resisting arrests".

                        Big problems now are drug dealers controlling the trade from inside prison. that is what BNN(indo's DEA) trying to end, by moving drug dealers to special prison on remote island guarded by dogs and crocodiles

                        BNN should focus on reducing demand side, to reduce the drug trade...

                        Best regards,
                        Ah, I was unaware of this. I was speaking to my gf about this topic awhile back and from her perspective it sounded as though even small amounts of something like marijuana will still land one in prison, not a rehab center. Perhaps we were both misinformed.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I am not sure that is entirely correct, as I remember the case of a bule who was sent to Cipinang after being found in possession of very small amount of marijuana at his home in Jakarta (As I recall, it was said to be something like two cigarettes and less than a gram of "rumput"). He later committed suicide - apparently - in custody. Can't remember his name at the moment but there was a thread here started by a friend of the man who was seeking help / advice / support for him. This was about two or three years ago.

                          So were the judges not following the same guidelines for sentencing a foreigner as for WNI, or is the information from fransgg not what is really, consistently practiced? I dunno the answer ...
                          [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Warden: "What we got here ... is failure to communicate."

                          The Dude: "Oh yeah? Well that's just, like, your opinion, man."[/FONT]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            http://m.hukumonline.com/berita/baca...bilitasiMinggu,
                            06/03/2016
                            Berita · Pusat Data · Klinik · Talks · FAQ · Karir · Produk

                            Search



                            Rabu, 09 September 2015 – dibaca:12112
                            Mengacu UU, Pengguna Narkotika Tetap Direhabilitasi
                            Mesti ada ukuran ketika seseorang berurusan dengan hukum. Khusus kasus narkotika untuk kesekian kali maka dilakukan penahanan.
                            RFQ
                            http://images.hukumonline.com/fronte...fc61a24c25.jpg Menkumham Yasonna Laoly. Foto: RES
                            Wacana pengguna narkotika bakal dipidanakan belakangan menjadi sorotan. Tak saja memberikan penghukuman, penjara diharapkan dapat menimbulkan efek jera bagi pengguna narkotika. Namun begitu, pemerintah tetap mengacu pada UU No.35 Tahun 2009 tentang Narkotika agar pengguna narkotika tetap direhabilitasi.

                            “Kalau revisi (UU 35/2009, red) itu kan belum. Sekarang, UU Narkotika pengguna direhabilitasi,” ujar Menteri Hukum dan Ham (Menkumham), Yasonna H Laoly, di Gedung DPR, Rabu (9/9).

                            Alasan tetap dilakukan rehabilitasi lantaran dalam rapat APBN 2015 telah disiapkan anggaran untuk melakukan rehabilitasi terhadap pengguna narkotika, meskipun jumlahnya terbatas. Rehabilitasi memang diberikan kepada mereka pengguna narkotika. Sedangkan pengedar dan kurir narkotika tetap diganjar hukuman berat sebagaimana tertuang dalam UU Narkotika.

                            “Dalam pelantikan saya katakan kalau pengguna narkoitka itu direhabilitasi,” imbuh mantan anggota DPR periode 2009-2014 itu.

                            Wakil Ketua Komisi III DPR Trimedya Pandjaitan berpandangan, banyaknya korban berjatuhan akibat keganasan narkotika sudah selayaknya dilakukan rehabilitasi. Ia menilai rehabilitasi masih amat diperlukan dalam menanggulangi korban narkotika, bukan sebaliknya dijebloskan ke dalam sel tahanan. Hanya saja, mesti ada ukuran ketika seseorang berurusan dengan hukum, khusus kasus narkotika untuk kesekian kali maka dilakukan penahanan.

                            “Terkecuali apa yang dimaksudkan oleh Pak Buwas (Budi Waseso, Kepala BNN) kalau itu terjadi di kalangan artis lebih dari sekali berurusan hukum sebagai pemakai narkoba, kalau lebih dari sekali tidak boleh direhabilitasi. Jadi harus ada ukurannya,” ujarnya.

                            Menurutnya, sepanjang pengguna baru tertangkap sekali dan dapat membuktikan hanya pengguna bukan pengedar, maka dapat dijatuhkan hukuman rehabilitasi. Menurutnya, korban narkotika banyak penyebabnya antara lain salah pergaulan, maupun korban hasil jebakan. Itu sebabnya, upaya rehabilitasi sebagai upaya terdepan sebelum mengambil pilihan menjebloskan di balik jeruji besi.

                            Politisi Partai Demokrasi Indonesia Perjuangan (PDIP) itu berpandangan, BNN pun mesti selektif ketika akan menjebloskan pengguna narkoba. Makanya dibutuhkan aturan jelas. BNN, kata Trimed, dapat membuat aturan internal selektif yang dapat menjadi acuan melakukan rehabilitasi atau pemenjaraan terhadap pengguna narkoba.

                            “Itu menjadi tugas Pak Buwas. Buat saja aturannya, kalau pertama boleh rehabilitasi, tapi kalau ke dua dan ketiga tidak ada rehabilitai. Dan rehabilitasi harus ada kontrolnya juga,” ujarnya.

                            Terpisah, peneliti Institute for Criminal Justice Reform (ICJR) Erasmus Napitupulu berpandangan penguatan terhadap penanganan kasus narkotika dengan memperkuat rehabilitas. Ia menilai persoalan narkotika tak akan selesai jika pengguna tidak direhabilitasi. Sebaliknya, pendekatan hukum secara represif justru tidak efektif. Dalam penanganan kasus narkotika, korban mesti dikedepankan.

                            “Perpektif pendekatan terhadap korban yang harus dikedepankan, dan tentu saja pemenjaraan bukan jawaban,” ujarnya.

                            Dikatakan pria biasa disapa Eras itu, pemenjaraan bakal menjadi pasar baru bagi para pengguna dan pecandu narkotika. Faktanya belakangan terakhir terbongkarnya kasus narkotika dengan mengendalikan dari balik jeruji besi. Menurutnya, bandar narkotika lebih memilih menyuplai ke dalam penjara karena pasarnya jelas.

                            Tak hanya itu, pemenjaraan terhadap pengguna narkotika berkorelasi dengan lapas yang dimiliki negara. Apalagi, beban lapas terhadap narapidana sudah terbilang berat. Makanya, memenjarakan pengguna narkotika justru akan membuat persoalan baru dengan over kapasitas lapas.

                            “Supply orang ke dalam lapas harus dikurangi. Dimulai dari victimless crime seperti pengguna narkotika,” pungkasnya.

                            Sebelumnya, Kepala Badan Narkotika Nasional (BNN) Komjen Budi Waseso (Buwas) selang dilantik mewacanakan akan mengusulkan revisi terhadap UU No.35 Tahun 2009. Revisi terkait dengan aturan rehabilitasi terhadap pengguna narkotika. Menurutnya BNN di bawah tampuk kepemimpinanya mesti mengedepankan penegakan hukum dalam pemberantasan narkoba secara efektif dan efisien. Apalagi Indonesia dalam kondisi darurat narkotika.

                            Kepemimpinan Buwas nampaknya bakal berbeda dengan Komjen Anang Iskandar. Di era Anang, BNN menerapkan konsep rehabilitasi terhadap para pengguna narkoba. Ya, aturan rehabilitasi tertuang dalam Pasal 54 UU No.35 Tahun 2009. Jika Pasal 54 direvisi kemudian dihapus, maka pengguna narkoba pun bakal dijebloskan penjara. Dengan begitu, Lapas dimungkinkan bakal kian sesak dengan narapidana pengguna narkotika.

                            Share:
                            4 Komentar | Kirim Komentar
                            BERITA TERKAIT:
                            BNN Imbau TKI Tidak Jadi Kurir Narkoba
                            Legislator Musi Banyuasin Serahkan Diri ke BNN
                            BNN Gandeng TNI Berantas Narkoba di LP
                            Pembahasan Hukuman Mati dalam RKUHP Belum Temui Titik Terang
                            Lewat Putusan, Hakim ‘Kritik’ Cara Polisi Tangani Kasus Narkoba
                            Untuk akses lebih cepat install hukumonlinecom untuk Android
                            Back »


                            Ke Atas · Berita Lainnya · Search
                            Lihat Versi Desktop
                            Home · RSS · FAQ · Term & Condition · Pedoman Berita · Kode Etik · Tentang Kami · Privacy Policy
                            Copyright © 2012 hukumonline.com, All Rights Reserved

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Bule lapar View Post
                              from her perspective it sounded as though even small amounts of something like marijuana will still land one in prison, not a rehab center.
                              Originally posted by Mister Bule View Post
                              I am not sure that is entirely correct, as I remember the case of a bule who was sent to Cipinang after being found in possession of very small amount of marijuana at his home in Jakarta
                              Since 2009 and the implementation of the new Narcotic Act (UU 35/2009) consumers who can prove their addiction MAY BE sentenced to rehabilitation rather than jail (or in fact and most often, concurrently to jail). It is the sense of article 127 (and article 54) which reads:

                              Pasal 127

                              (1) Setiap Penyalah Guna:

                              a. Narkotika Golongan I bagi diri sendiri dipidana dengan pidana penjara paling lama 4 (empat) tahun;

                              b. Narkotika Golongan II bagi diri sendiri dipidana dengan pidana penjara paling lama 2 (dua) tahun; dan

                              c. Narkotika Golongan III bagi diri sendiri dipidana dengan pidana penjara paling lama 1 (satu) tahun.

                              (2) Dalam memutus perkara sebagaimana dimaksud pada ayat (1), hakim wajib memperhatikan ketentuan sebagaimana dimaksud dalam Pasal 54, Pasal 55, dan Pasal 103.

                              (3) Dalam hal Penyalah Guna sebagaimana dimaksud pada ayat (1) dapat dibuktikan atau terbukti sebagai korban penyalahgunaan Narkotika, Penyalah Guna tersebut wajib menjalani rehabilitasi medis dan rehabilitasi sosial.


                              However for a prosecutor to indict you with article 127, and that you therefore spend most of your jail time in rehab rather than cell, instead of any of the harsher articles of UU 35/2009, you will have to produce more than just a few medical certificate proving your addiction. This is not what the prosecutors usually are looking for (personal message: Hey Fed! Report that one too please). In fact foreigners and other "wealthy" categories caught with a bit of dope do usually reasonably well to convince prosecutors (and judges) that they are consumers victim of addiction. Those with a different background usually get to share a 50+ people cell.

                              @MB,
                              I won't publicize the name of the foreigner you refer but he committed suicide in rehab with Yayasan Lima Rehabilitasi Narkoba not while in custody in Cipinang (where he has been also held). His suicide while in rehab is not an isolated case unfortunately.
                              Last edited by atlantis; 06-03-16, 16:30.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X