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  • Future of Young Indonesian Generation

    While reading the tread about "Limiting condom..." wich limitation is totaly goal at young generation, I had a question who pop in my mind and can't find an answer. And goes I write this tread...

    Preambule
    I'm Canadian and part of the generation X. We have no weight in anything because our poucentage of population is too much low, stuck in between the mass of babyboomer and the mass of younger generation.
    We are totaly not intereted in politic as anyway we can't change anything. Even singer of our generation had trouble to rise has no radio want play their as they don't please the mass of public, the babyboomer.

    INdonesia is at the opposite, they have a huge young mass of young people.

    What will happen with this generation?

    Now they are mostly unemploy (73%) *see note* which create high level of criminality among them. What economic situation can they hope to have in 10-20 year?

    They seem to have mentality shift from older generation, with time they will (together with younger generation) have major political (vote-demo) weight.
    What (politically related) change can we expect they could bring in the country?

    In 10-20 year, what kind of indonesia do they will have? In which way can they affect it?

    The point I have absolutely no clue (I'm not in Java nor in a muslim family) is how much are they influenced by religious leader. Less or more than older generation?


    Note: from jukung information the number are 73% of unemploy are under 24. Which make it at around 30% of unemployment. Way less than what mentionned by the politician, but still quite high.
    Last edited by PhilippeD; 23-06-15, 11:54.
    La motivation vient en se motivant ~ Motivation come by self-motivation

  • #2
    Well, the Jokowi effect was rather interesting. But also something we have seen many times in the west before (people voting for the fresh breez of air or for the extremists) and it always returns to the old situation after the novelty wears off. I'm just concerned people will be so disappointed in the current legislature, next time it really could be the more extreme parties getting all the votes.

    I do think the 'mostly unemployed and high criminality' statement is exaggerated though. And it will take a couple of generations more before a higher level in Maslow is achieved. Of course there is more middle class than say 15 years ago.

    Student movements seem to be be asleep or have no more claws. Perhaps that's a worldwide phenomena? Sometimes I feel it's all sitting in their bedroom on (a)social media and gaming, without being really engaged in any political or community activities. I guess every decade has its trend.
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    • #3
      I'm not holding my breath, I don't expect them to turn the country upside down.

      I'm curious in which "trend" (for take your word) this could affect indonesia.

      You can't keep a whole generation at 73% unemploy for ever!
      This will have his impact on indonesia economic (where ever how much the number are trustable).
      La motivation vient en se motivant ~ Motivation come by self-motivation

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      • #4
        Originally posted by PhilippeD View Post
        I'm not holding my breath, I don't expect them to turn the country upside down.

        I'm curious in which "trend" (for take your word) this could affect indonesia.

        You can't keep a whole generation at 73% unemploy for ever!
        This will have his impact on indonesia economic (where ever how much the number are trustable).
        Hi,

        According to World Bank, the unemployment rate in Indonesia is 6.3%, of total labor force (around 120 million people).
        So it is not 73% unemployment - it's actually the opposite. Perhaps you can elaborate your sources?
        Source:
        http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SL.UEM.TOTL.ZS

        Another note, Ipsos survey result put Indonesians are the "happiest people on earth": http://www.ipsos-na.com/news-polls/p...e.aspx?id=6400
        while Nielsen put Indonesians as the second most optimist consumers, in the world (http://www.nielsen.com/consumerconfidence)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Rayindra View Post
          Hi,

          According to World Bank, the unemployment rate in Indonesia is 6.3%, of total labor force (around 120 million people).
          So it is not 73% unemployment - it's actually the opposite. Perhaps you can elaborate your sources?
          Source:
          http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SL.UEM.TOTL.ZS

          Another note, Ipsos survey result put Indonesians are the "happiest people on earth": http://www.ipsos-na.com/news-polls/p...e.aspx?id=6400
          while Nielsen put Indonesians as the second most optimist consumers, in the world (http://www.nielsen.com/consumerconfidence)
          I believe Philippe is referring to the huge part of the economy that is off the books. I read about in the Jakarta paper this morning (Can't recall if it was the Globe or Post).

          73% is a huge number. I thought it was in the 20% range, but I don't have the paper here.
          Sasa Bule is having a bayi!

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          • #6
            & the polygraph test puts them all as ????
            The answer is 42 .... any questions? .

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            • #7
              The 73 number was bring by a politician who was wondering what how he will do with them.
              He talk about giving them formation for being qualified at an international level for attrat foreign investment.
              The number was about a precise unamed part of the population - called youth - mentionned by a politician in a indonesian news paper... Nothing I would put my trust on...


              I don't care of the number, I also have trouble to believe the 6.5
              But clearly it have a good share of young which presently don't have work.
              La motivation vient en se motivant ~ Motivation come by self-motivation

              Comment


              • #8
                Oh well, in a country where all these construction/warung/kaki5/security/parking-attendant workers and household staff residing in the cities, are not registered, still have their KTP in the kampung, don't pay taxes and are not even aware of a BPJS, it seems to me almost impossible to put any realistic number on unemployment.

                And a sensus ahead of elections doesn't really help either; only the KK's are being considered as base (which are already wrong).

                I'm adding some comments on Jukung's quote here and the research link.
                [COLOR=#333333]Note, unemployment figures are usually calculated as people looking for work. So people that are full time students not looking for a job are not usually factored in.[/COLOR]
                [COLOR=#333333]That is the point I was making, over here there is no 'unemployment office' with a central database of available jobs. So they can only make statements about the formal sector with people who work for registered companies. And even then. (Don't think for a second all these young guys working in those thousands of small toko's are on a payroll or so.) And the informal sector is a best guess.
                [/COLOR]
                Last edited by jstar; 22-06-15, 22:03. Reason: comment on research posted
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                • #9
                  Around 73% of the people unemployed are under 24.

                  I have seen many statistics ranging from 25-35% unemployment for age 16 - 24.
                  Note, unemployment figures are usually calculated as people looking for work. So people that are full time students not looking for a job are not usually factored in.

                  Youth unemployment in Indonesia is 4-5 times higher than most other surrounding nations.


                  http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/pub...cms_214659.pdf

                  I had done a little research into this recently. Some may have read my questions comparing education, employment, and salaries between the U.S. and Indonesia for some college advising for a few families that were comparing sending their children to college in the U.S. or Indonesia.

                  I am sorry if this is going to offend some. I know there are a lot of Indonesian teachers on this forum. Almost all my research pointed that Indonesia's education system is one of the worst for almost any developing country. Because of corruption and low standards, many of the youth are considered unprepared and unqualified for many jobs. This goes even if they are college graduates. An Indonesian education is largely not accepted in most of the developed world.

                  The lack of rule of law and corruption undermines every aspect of society.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by waarmstrong
                    A thunder storm passed through our little corner of the Midwest yesterday.

                    That's a pretty picture, but I don't see that it has anything to do with the future of Indonesian youth.
                    Sasa Bule is having a bayi!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Are stay at home mums classified as unemployed?

                      Indonesia in the majority of areas outside of cites still has a traditional man go to work women stays home and look after the house and has kids mentality.

                      70% unemployment is totally unrealistic, i know a broad spectrum of young people, well off, middle class, and very poor and the majority have work of some kind or study.

                      However in more remote areas technically the unemployment rate could be that high, but its a different society its more traditional living off the land and sea, catch some fish to eat everyday, maybe one day get a good catch so sell some at the market or to other people, get enough money for basics like soap etc.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jukung11 View Post
                        Around 73% of the people unemployed are under 24.

                        I have seen many statistics ranging from 25-35% unemployment for age 16 - 24.
                        Note, unemployment figures are usually calculated as people looking for work. So people that are full time students not looking for a job are not usually factored in.

                        Youth unemployment in Indonesia is 4-5 times higher than most other surrounding nations.


                        http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/pub...cms_214659.pdf

                        I had done a little research into this recently. Some may have read my questions comparing education, employment, and salaries between the U.S. and Indonesia for some college advising for a few families that were comparing sending their children to college in the U.S. or Indonesia.

                        I am sorry if this is going to offend some. I know there are a lot of Indonesian teachers on this forum. Almost all my research pointed that Indonesia's education system is one of the worst for almost any developing country. Because of corruption and low standards, many of the youth are considered unprepared and unqualified for many jobs. This goes even if they are college graduates. An Indonesian education is largely not accepted in most of the developed world.

                        The lack of rule of law and corruption undermines every aspect of society.
                        Thanks a lot Jukung for the precision and number



                        Now that we have more relevant number can we move the conversation to a more interesting topic like prediction of indo in 10-20 year and how this young generation will affect indonesia?
                        La motivation vient en se motivant ~ Motivation come by self-motivation

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by PhilippeD View Post
                          Thanks a lot Jukung for the precision and number



                          Now that we have more relevant number can we move the conversation to a more interesting topic like prediction of indo in 10-20 year and how this young generation will affect indonesia?
                          After the fall of Suharto, a baby boom started. So now they are teenagers, still studying, or already working, or out-of-school & unemployed. More & more each year will join the workforce, if the government cannot create enough jobs, poverty & crime will increase every year. Some will turn to religion and become radicalized, there is risk of Indonesia becoming an Islamic State in 10-20 years.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by sul1995 View Post
                            After the fall of Suharto, a baby boom started. So now they are teenagers, still studying, or already working, or out-of-school & unemployed. More & more each year will join the workforce, if the government cannot create enough jobs, poverty & crime will increase every year. Some will turn to religion and become radicalized, there is risk of Indonesia becoming an Islamic State in 10-20 years.
                            Suharto left power in May 1998. So the oldest of this so called resulting Baby Boom would only be 16 or so. Not old enough to be officially in the work force yet.
                            Sasa Bule is having a bayi!

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                            • #15
                              So... The problem of unemployed youth is just starting???
                              La motivation vient en se motivant ~ Motivation come by self-motivation

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