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Chapter Six - In Which Malala Wins The Nobel Peace Prize

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  • Chapter Six - In Which Malala Wins The Nobel Peace Prize

    Pakistani Muslim education activist Malala Yousafzai and Indian Hindu children's rights activist Kailash Satyarthi have been announced as the co-winners of the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize.


    http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...ace-prize-2014


    What is so amazing about Malala? For me, the fact that she is basically just an ordinary Pakistani girl. One who happens to be incredibly bright, intelligent, articulate, optimistic and brave ... exactly what her enemies fear the most and seek to extinguish.

    Way to go, Malala: keep speaking out.


    Who run this [email protected]$#%[email protected]#@$&? Girls!
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Warden: "What we got here ... is failure to communicate."

    The Dude: "Oh yeah? Well that's just, like, your opinion, man."[/FONT]

  • #2
    A very fitting choice.
    [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Verdana]Some love to milk Apostate.[/FONT][/COLOR]

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    • #3
      She shared it with a guy from India but the poor chap is somewhat overshadowed by Malala.
      "[COLOR=#000000][FONT=Helvetica Neue]I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it.[/FONT][/COLOR]"
      George Bernard Shaw

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      • #4
        I'm struck by how articulate Malala is, considering her young age. There can hardly be a better spokeperson for the cause of education opportunity for girls and women. The nobel committee has chosen wisely this time.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Mister Bule View Post
          Pakistani Muslim education activist Malala Yousafzai and Indian Hindu children's rights activist Kailash Satyarthi have been announced as the co-winners of the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize.


          http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...ace-prize-2014


          What is so amazing about Malala? For me, the fact that she is basically just an ordinary Pakistani girl. One who happens to be incredibly bright, intelligent, articulate, optimistic and brave ... exactly what her enemies fear the most and seek to extinguish.

          Way to go, Malala: keep speaking out.


          Who run this [email protected]$#%[email protected]#@$&? Girls!
          Picking up on your word "ordinary". (not sure what the @#$ stuff means)

          ISLAMABAD: Schoolgirl activist Malala Yousafzai's courageous fightback from being shot by the Taliban has transformed her both into a symbol for human rights and a campaigner in global demand.
          Few teenagers can lay claim to a Nobel prize, or say they spent their 17th birthday lobbying Nigeria's president to do more to free hundreds of girls kidnapped by Islamist militants.
          But Malala is no ordinary teen. She had already been in the public eye for years when a Taliban gunman boarded her school bus on Oct 9, 2012, asked "Who is Malala?", and shot her in the head.

          Her father Ziauddin, a school principal and himself a seasoned campaigner for education, helped propel the precociously talented girl from the Swat valley in northwest Pakistan into the limelight.
          In this photograph taken on Aug 18, 2014 Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai meets with students at United Nations headquarters in New York. (AFP/Stan Honda)
          At his encouragement, Malala started writing a blog for the BBC's Urdu service under a pseudonym in 2009, aged just 11, about life under the Taliban in Swat, where they were banning girls' education.
          In 2007 the Islamist militants had taken over the area, which Malala affectionately called "My Swat", and imposed a brutal, bloody rule. Opponents were murdered, people were publicly flogged for supposed breaches of sharia law, women were banned from going to market, and girls were stopped from going to school.
          Her blog, written anonymously with the clarity and frankness of a child, opened a window for Pakistan onto the miseries being perpetrated within its borders. But it was only after the shooting in 2012, and Malala's subsequent near-miraculous recovery in a British hospital, that she became a truly global figure.

          Extract Channel News Asia

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          • #6
            Ah yes, John, perhaps we can say she encompasses the extraordinary within the ordinary ... or not, take your pick.

            Guess you've missed the last few years of Beyonce's music career ...
            [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Warden: "What we got here ... is failure to communicate."

            The Dude: "Oh yeah? Well that's just, like, your opinion, man."[/FONT]

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            • #7
              Perhaps next year they'll consider giving it to Nabila and her family.

              http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opi...857549913.html

              Malala's story is certainly compelling, but I'd like to see her focused on the other side of the equation of violence in Afghanistan and Pakistan: the United States.

              http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/12/politi...las/index.html

              Go get 'em girl.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by DanInAceh View Post
                Perhaps next year they'll consider giving it to Nabila and her family.

                http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opi...857549913.html

                Malala's story is certainly compelling, but I'd like to see her focused on the other side of the equation of violence in Afghanistan and Pakistan: the United States.

                http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/12/politi...las/index.html

                Go get 'em girl.
                She was shot for advocating education for girls. That deeply ingrained attitude that assigns secondary roles to women long predate drone strikes.
                "[COLOR=#000000][FONT=Helvetica Neue]I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it.[/FONT][/COLOR]"
                George Bernard Shaw

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lantern View Post
                  She was shot for advocating education for girls. That deeply ingrained attitude that assigns secondary roles to women long predate drone strikes.
                  Yes, because there's nothing as novel as powerful nations launching targeted assassinations.

                  Oh wait...

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                  • #10
                    She should have gotten this for just being alive after being shot in the head. To remind us there were some morons preaching a religion that made people shot a 14 years old girl in the head with no heart.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Missnaughty View Post
                      She should have gotten this for just being alive after being shot in the head. To remind us there were some morons preaching a religion that made people shot a 14 years old girl in the head with no heart.
                      No, she should have - and has - gotten it for doing all that she has done, both before and after being shot ... for standing up to those morons and demanding basic educational and other rights for herself and all children, boys and girls alike.
                      [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Warden: "What we got here ... is failure to communicate."

                      The Dude: "Oh yeah? Well that's just, like, your opinion, man."[/FONT]

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mister Bule View Post
                        No, she should have - and has - gotten it for doing all that she has done, both before and after being shot ... for standing up to those morons and demanding basic educational and other rights for herself and all children, boys and girls alike.
                        Great stuff Sir. Spoken like a true liberal.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by johntap View Post
                          Great stuff Sir. Spoken like a true liberal.
                          Sorry, no idea what that is meant to convey, but if I had to take a blind stab in the dark at what you might be trying to say, it shouldn't even need to be said, in response, that the great majority of Muslims worldwide believe in and support the education of their children, both boys and girls. There, I've said it ... does that make most Muslims "liberals"?
                          Last edited by Mister Bule; 12-10-14, 23:10.
                          [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Warden: "What we got here ... is failure to communicate."

                          The Dude: "Oh yeah? Well that's just, like, your opinion, man."[/FONT]

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                          • #14
                            Just this notion.... "demanding basic educational and other rights for herself and all children, boys and girls alike." That's liberal isn't it?

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                            • #15
                              Not to me, just "dasar", but I'm sure it depends who you ask. If you ask the guys who shot her, I'm sure they'll tell you it's blasphemy and an outrageous affront to God to even say such a thing, but as I've mentioned, that is not what most Muslims believe nor how they feel.

                              We have to be able to separate religion or religious culture from "geographical" or ethnic traditional culture, remember. The Pashtuns and dudes in the Swat Valley and other areas of Pakistan and Afghanistan have been holding their tribal traditions and practices for thousands of years ... they may have "interpreted" the Qur'an to mean that females should not be educated, but practices like arranged marriages and honor killings and the cultural attitudes those come from are part of their own ethnic culture, and the latter ones mentioned have nothing to do with Islam.
                              Last edited by Mister Bule; 12-10-14, 23:26.
                              [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Warden: "What we got here ... is failure to communicate."

                              The Dude: "Oh yeah? Well that's just, like, your opinion, man."[/FONT]

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