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Shariah law applies to non-Muslims too

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  • #16
    Originally posted by martindo View Post
    [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica]
    [FONT=Verdana]The noun "option" means the choice is made by the accused, so it's fairly obvious that a non-Muslim who did something NOT forbidden by civil law would choose civil court.[/FONT][/FONT][/COLOR]
    Actually I read it as thus: If an act is both against the civil law and against syariah, and the accuser is non-muslim, he/she can chose in which venue to be tried. However, if an act is only illegal in syariah (lets say drinking alcohol), then the non-muslim offender WILL be tried in syariah court.

    I didn't ponder it any further, as Aceh is not really high on my bucket list of places to visit.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Berlarutlarut View Post
      The funny thing is a few years back they opened a big shiny new airport, with a big display showing huge increases of passenger numbers based on tourism.

      So how do they plan to achieve this increase in tourism? Building hotels, roads and resorts? Err, no, imposing Sharia law on non-muslims. Genius.
      Aceh is a regional destination, and it has indeed been increasing somewhat over the past few years. I doubt their goal is now or has ever been to attract someone like yourself to the region. It's also not to attract wealthy Arabs from afar. It's regional; Malaysians and Indonesians almost exclusively. For the two parties, the implementation of the shari'a suits them just fine.

      Of course, I always argue that tourism is a dead-end anyway.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by sul1995 View Post
        Coming Soon in Aceh: Shariah Law for Non-Muslims (22 September 2014)
        http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/news/...w-non-muslims/
        from the article:"T[COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica]eungku Faisal Ali, head of the Aceh branch of Nahdlatul Ulama, also said the bylaw would not discriminate against non-Muslims because they would still be able to worship and conduct their religious activities as they wish.[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica]“Please don’t portray this bylaw as if it mistreats non-Muslims, because the clause does not force Islamic Shariah on non-Muslims — they still can pray according to their religion,” Teungku said."

        This is very interesting as many people, including some forum members, see NU as the voice of a friendlier, more moderate form of Islam. This demonstrates, for the umpteenth thousandth time, that NU is nothing of the sort. They are Muslims, and that means they seek implementation of the shari'a to some degree.

        "Moharriadi, who is also from the PKS, argued that the new bylaw was based on the Aceh special autonomy law of 2006.[/FONT][/COLOR]
        [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica]“The clause in question in the Qanun Jinayat was taken in whole from Article 11 of the Law on Governing Aceh, so the article wasn’t made in Aceh, it was made by the House of Representatives in Jakarta,” he said.[/FONT][/COLOR]
        [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica]Moharriadi explained that the bylaw had been discussed with all stakeholders, including the Religious Affairs Ministry Justice and Human Rights Ministry, Home Affairs Ministry and the Supreme Court.[/FONT][/COLOR]
        [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica]“Every time we deliberated the bylaw in Jakarta nobody makes a fuss about the clause because it has been clearly mentioned in the Law on Governing Aceh,” he said. “If we didn’t include the clause we would have broken the law.”

        And this is where things get interesting. The meat of all of this is that it's a demonstration of Aceh's autonomy. The thing we must never forget about politics concerning Aceh is that the Acehnese want to be rid of Indonesia. This is almost universal, I can count the number of Acehnese Indonesian loyalists I have met on one hand. And they are correct, the Law on Governing Aceh DOES, in fact, give them the authority to enact the shari'a in accordance with local custom. The local custom bit is important because Acehnese values and law (Qanun Aceh) don't always mirror shari'a 100%. Inheritance is a big example of this, the eldest daughter gets everything. That's directly contradictory to shari'a. And yet, that's how the law is set up in Aceh.

        Indonesia gave them authority to do this.

        "Domidoyo Ratupenu, a priest and Aceh-based interfaith activist, said he had raised the issue with the DPRA, but that he felt his concern was ignored.[/FONT][/COLOR]
        [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica]“Personally I reject all discriminative laws and bylaws based on primordialist beliefs and that fail to consider the nation’s sociopolitical reality,” Domidoyo said.[/FONT][/COLOR]
        [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica]“Indonesia is a pluralistic nation that has Pancasila as its ideology and appreciates diversity.

        "Appreciates diversity," ah, that's my favorite lie in this string of nonsense statements. Gives lip service to, perhaps, but appreciates? That's a very strong word. Indonesia should not exist; it is a colonial project of the Javanese rather than an honest, multi-confessional and pluralist society. It does not properly support nor protect its ethnic minorities, at least not in the sense understood by people who live in pluralist societies.

        Of course, consider the source. He is a direct beneficiary of Indonesia's policies, which are unfavorable to the indigenous peoples of Aceh and Gayoland. He lives in a world of Java privilege. [/FONT][/COLOR]

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        • #19
          I'd also like to reiterate that I am not a fan of enforcing shari'a punishments on non-Muslims.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by DanInAceh View Post
            [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica]Indonesia should not exist; it is a colonial project of the Javanese rather than an honest, multi-confessional and pluralist society. It does not properly support nor protect its ethnic minorities, at least not in the sense understood by people who live in pluralist societies.
            [/FONT][/COLOR]
            Just to step outside the thread topic of religion, could you briefly explain "colonial" in the above quote on an apparently secular topic? Are you saying that the Dutch gave this project to the Javanese (like the unification of the "Kingdom" of Hawaii in 19th century), or that the Javanese had this project since Majapahit Era?

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            • #21
              Originally posted by martindo View Post
              Just to step outside the thread topic of religion, could you briefly explain "colonial" in the above quote on an apparently secular topic? Are you saying that the Dutch gave this project to the Javanese (like the unification of the "Kingdom" of Hawaii in 19th century), or that the Javanese had this project since Majapahit Era?
              I can't briefly do anything, you know that.

              What is the face of Indonesia abroad? Is it a diverse face, or one that is primarily Javanese? Where is power centrally located in Indonesia? Who were the beneficiaries of the transmigration program, and did it serve a purpose beyond the stated purpose of land distribution and increasing farm output?

              When you ask about Java being the colonial center of Indonesia, consider this from the point of view of its ethnic minorities. Who benefits from the extraction of their resources? Does it benefit the locals, particularly in the case of Papua, or does it go to fuel the growth of Indonesia's core? Are resources evenly spread to these outlying regions? Does the government intentionally attempt to suppress and replace the local population?

              These inequalities are real and pervasive, and they suggest that Indonesia exists more as a colonial project. The Javanese exist in a society that is comparable to white privilege in the United States. They may hem and haw and claim that they do not directly benefit from these exploitative policies, but they do and in spades.

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              • #22
                Also, I think this has more to do with why Aceh does what it does than religion. At heart, Aceh's implementation of Qanun Aceh is all about exerting their independence. So don't feel like you're derailing the thread. On the contrary, you're touching on the core issue.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by martindo View Post
                  Just to step outside the thread topic of religion, could you briefly explain "colonial" in the above quote on an apparently secular topic? Are you saying that the Dutch gave this project to the Javanese (like the unification of the "Kingdom" of Hawaii in 19th century), or that the Javanese had this project since Majapahit Era?
                  I don't know if I would term it a "project". However since the Majapahit Era, Java was and is a regional powerhouse, with approximately the same population as all the other islands combined, and were significantly more advanced economically and technologically. When the Dutch and Japanese left after WW2, it was almost natural for this power to spill out to fill the vacuum. The departing Dutch tried to forestall this by agreeing to Indonesian independence if it were constructed as a Federal Republic, with each states maintaining broad rights, but this was abandoned as soon as the Dutch left.

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                  • #24
                    Speaking of Aceh... I know they use a bit in cooking up there at times..but i have a feeling this aint for cooking, hope it wasn't your truck that broke down Dan :P

                    [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica]"Police in Aceh came across two tons of cannabis hidden in a truck after the vehicle broke down and the driver went looking for spare parts, according to local media".[/FONT][/COLOR]


                    http://thejakartaglobe.beritasatu.co...river-wanders/

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