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End "Yellowface" Mikado, says Asian dude.

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  • End "Yellowface" Mikado, says Asian dude.

    Humorous article of the day.

    http://www.cnn.com/2014/07/17/opinio...mikado-racism/

    Thoughts?

  • #2
    i dont really understand why this would be racist (even tho my mom original name is Yoko Kosaka), sorry probably i just need to see the show to understand it myself or probably i just cant see the racism from the US critics perspective ... to say something is racist or not it really is not that simple these days... for instance its like this, since most traditional "elder" at Japan already declare that "Young Japaneese people had forgotten their identity", so if this "The Mikado" would play at Japan can it be call racism? or would be it be a "sharp" critique for young Japaneese to claim their traditional identity?... the poor play can be easily debated as "at least they try", while the lack of "original blood" can easily debated as the lack of "original" actors that wanted the part... so i guess i think i could understand more if it call a "poor play" rather then racism for now
    10 step to eternity...

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    • #3
      it's a brilliant operetta in any case

      "I have a little list"

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Berlarutlarut View Post
        it's a brilliant operetta in any case
        Quoted for truth.

        Actual blackface is offensive not because a white actor dons make up to look like a black caricature, but because the act also includes portrayals of blacks as lazy, dumb, loud, obnoxious, servile and buffoons. The Mikado does nothing of the sort with Japanese characters, and merely is a goofy little operetta. If the names and costumes seem exaggerated and silly, that's because it sets the tone for the work. This is also a "one-off" deal for G&S. Blackface performances were generally ongoing with new material and new ways to sell racism. While The Mikado was their most successful work, that was it.

        Honestly, stuff like this makes me long to return to Asia, where it appears nobody gives a flying fuck about this kind of nonsense.

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        • #5
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portray...s_in_Hollywood
          There are definite grounds for complaint, especially pre ww2 prejudice directed at star Sessue Hayakawa, then a heart-throb.

          OTOH, banning Charlie Chan seems idiotic to me. It's not a parody like Mikado (and Chomper's quote about "they never will be missed" is apropos to one of the current threads in the Politics section of this forum) nor an idealization about naive Asians like the earlier opera Madame Butterfly. It's a portrayal of a Chinese American in an admirable profession.

          But what pisses me off most about this kind of "whoever squawks gets attention, and everyone else in the group who didn't care has to nod their head or else be called the equivalent of Uncle Tom" is the presumption of the blogger regarding the "unity" of those whose origin is from a whole continent.

          Please give us a break with the political backrubbing inherent in the term "Asian American". Unlike African Americans, there is no shared heritage of slavery and blurring of national origin. And unlike Hispanics, there is no language called "Asian" spoken by the presumed uber-ethnic group.

          Take a look at your local "Asian American" society, newsletter, college group etc. -- I bet 80-90% of the leaders' surnames are Chinese. So, it strikes me that this term has become a political vehicle for Chinese Americans who are shy (?) about standing on their own as an ethnic group: "everyone come under the banner that we are waving" which is a kumbaya NOT found in Asia at all. Ask pribumi in Indonesia or Malaysia, or Vietnamese, Japanese, Koreans.
          Last edited by martindo; 24-07-14, 08:30.

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          • #6
            I wonder how Mukakuning, the suburb next to where I live would go down in some parts.

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            • #7
              Here's some evidence of what I mean by politicking:

              In California, my absentee ballot is printed in English, Spanish, and Chinese, NOT "English, Spanish, and Asian".

              Although 13% of California is "Asian" by race (second only to the % in Hawaii), in fact Filipinos outnumber Chinese in California:
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California#Demographics

              So why is Chinese used on the ballot in California (w/o Filipino, Vietnamese, Korean)? Probably the result of pressure from the "Asian" American lobby.

              BTW, has anyone in this forum ever taken a driver's license exam in the US in Bahasa? The Calif written exam is available in Tagalog/Filipino and a couple dozen other languages but not Bahasa last time I looked (2013).

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