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  • Change in law following the election?

    I rarely talk about politic. But i feel concerned by this one and it give me some worried.

    I heard Prabowo was quite xenophobe, ex military and on his politic agenda he is talking a lot about changing law.

    Here is my question:
    Is he really xenophobe?
    With his military background, how much thing can goes bad, particularly for the Chinese community?
    What law do he plan to change and how this can affect foreigner?

    Does it have anything positive that can come out of him? or it will simply make an overall step back for Indonesia?
    La motivation vient en se motivant ~ Motivation come by self-motivation

  • #2
    Prabowo is Suharto's son in law, nuff said.

    Comment


    • #3
      That would "was," not "is." A similar conclusion might be drawn from the fact that Hatta "is" the father in law of SBY's son. Could you therefore conclude that a Prabowo-Hatta administration is likely to be hesitant and wishy-washy?

      Comment


      • #4
        Oh, I forgot that about Hatta -- seems like another aspect of besan being a kind of "Suharto Lite", creating his own party (on his birthday no less). Good thing the constitutional change that concentrated more power in the hands of the president and brought direct election also imposed a 2-term limit.

        Prabowo has a scary (but unproven) reputation among Chinese here, possibly related to (also unproven) rumors that he provoked May 1998 riots as an attempt to destabilize Reformasi and get Big Daddy back in the saddle. He headed special forces, not a regular army division, so it's hard to point to any specific actions he took in the field, one way or the other.

        As for "positive", that depends on your viewpoint. If you are a die-hard globalization believer who swallows the latest media epithet "resource nationalism" (i.e., a country that claims to own its natural resources is out of touch with the "fact" that the global market should own them), then you are probably wondering which of the two supposed nationalistic candidates would be better/worse. If you think that Indonesia has spread its legs too wide for too long by giving away its resources at low prices (e.g, natural gas to China), then perhaps even Prabowo can effect some positive change.

        Comment


        • #5
          There has been quite a few articles in the English Language Media about Prabowo since announcing his running. An Editorial earlier this week was published about some of the fears of Prabowo being elected and bringing back a Suharta style of rule where the military will take charge and do anything and everything they please without question. That was in the Jakarta Post. Many feel that it is true, Chinese will start looking over their shoulders again foreigners will start to be fazed out with the removal and takeover of foreign investments.

          Some of Prabowo's human rights evidence was published the other day in the copy of the letter kicking him out of the military. His invitation for FPI to join him and his affiliation with the many Islamic parties may give everyone a glimpse of him leading up to the elections. There is fear he will use these people to cause problems. Old politics. Then, when he is elected he said his first order of duty was to declare Suharto a national hero.
          [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Verdana]Some love to milk Apostate.[/FONT][/COLOR]

          Comment


          • #6
            FP, your first paragraph sounds confused and confusing. True, Prabowo has less credibility than, say St. Paul, in terms of a known persecutor being praised in his own time for reforming his own behavior. However, "takeover of foreign investments" was never a New Order policy.

            Suharto remained in power by bending over (backwards, I suppose) so that any foreign interest with enough baksheesh could get unfettered access (no local residents complaining about community rights, pollution, etc.) to natural resources. A fire sale when there was no fire, other than his own inability to institute social justice and create an independent middle class (independent meaning not directly sucking the teat of his corrupt funding flow, but having a viable business not extorted by officials, preman, Pemuda Pancasila, etc.).

            Remember, Chinese did not panic during 32 years of the New Order -- only the May 1998 riots after Suharto resigned brought out their urgent flight and strong emotions, in contrast to grudging "grin and bear it" cooperation with corrupt practices at all levels for three decades.

            So, which is it? Fear of New Order? Or fear of Prabowo himself?

            If it's New Order, one can argue that the outgoing administration has been 10 years of "Suharto Lite" with power re-centralized by constitutional amendment (despite otonomi daerah) and the return of nefarious influences such as beef import scandal, Bank Century bailout/swindle, Lapindo going unpunished, etc.

            True, the military have reformed, such as generals actively refusing to team up with bullies (and even rebuking mid-level officers who do, as recounted to me by a Chinese Indonesian businessman friend who was being extorted by someone backed by a local colonel) and using the electoral process to seek power.

            Prabowo certainly gained power by being Suharto's in-law but what about the current prez in-laws, compared to say the in-laws of Gus Dur? One of them (or rather a besan) is running for VP, a weak but obvious attempt to main family influence in dynastic fashion.
            Last edited by martindo; 13-06-14, 07:24.

            Comment


            • #7
              As for national hero, that's a significant reflection of his bias, but it's small potatoes. Look at some of the existing national heroes enshrined by history rather than post-independence politics. For example, there's an imam who forcibly converted Bataks, as pointed out to me by an expat in Medan whose wife is a Batak Muslim from a remote village. National Hero status is a little like Daughters of the American Revolution, a kind of in-group for mutual admiration and puffery, but not very meaningful outside of classroom indoctrination.

              Nice signature BTW. Is it a quiet process, like my dad's quip about irregular spelling: Silent like the "p" in "bed"?

              Comment


              • #8
                Frankly Martindo, there is just too much ties to family it seems. My fear is Prabowo himself basically due to things he has said and written in the parties platform. His actions in inviting in the likes of FPI are very questionable to me.

                i can't vote so really I have no say in these matters. All I can do is sit back and wait and see.
                [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Verdana]Some love to milk Apostate.[/FONT][/COLOR]

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by fastpitch17 View Post
                  There has been quite a few articles in the English Language Media about Prabowo since announcing his running. An Editorial earlier this week was published about some of the fears of Prabowo being elected and bringing back a Suharta style of rule where the military will take charge and do anything and everything they please without question. That was in the Jakarta Post. Many feel that it is true, Chinese will start looking over their shoulders again foreigners will start to be fazed out with the removal and takeover of foreign investments.

                  Some of Prabowo's human rights evidence was published the other day in the copy of the letter kicking him out of the military. His invitation for FPI to join him and his affiliation with the many Islamic parties may give everyone a glimpse of him leading up to the elections. There is fear he will use these people to cause problems. Old politics. Then, when he is elected he said his first order of duty was to declare Suharto a national hero.
                  This part is confusing to me, insofar as Suharto and the FPI-type groups pretty much HATED each other (unless I am reading history incorrectly). Suharto enforced Pancisila, and declared illegal any mass organization which did not openly embrace Pancisila. The proto-FPI groups (FPI itself had not yet formed) were highly resentful of this requirement.

                  Anyway, I am not going to publicly (or even privately, for the most part) declare support or opposition to any particular candidate. When one is an expat teacher in Indonesia, one must always have contingency plans. If the winds shift, and my position here becomes untenable, then my family and I will just have to adapt to whatever new circumstances arise.
                  This space is available for rent.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    One more thing to consider: Prabowo may be serving as a kind of punching bag, bringing certain issues to the fore so that Jokowi gets pressured by the media in advance of a probable win. Remember all of the Obama 2008 promises about rolling back the security state, etc. Then he got "bipartisan" and started mouthing some of the same blather that his predecessor had used to justify excesses. The result was that "change" to "shake up the status quo" hardly made a tremor.

                    Some keywords to watch for in mainstream media (especially those that parrot or directly quote foreign "pundits") are phrases like "resource nationalism" and the holy, untouchable principle "foreign investment" (which will hopefully not rear its ugly head among well-meaning people trying to defend JIS because it could backfire for them).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      http://finance.yahoo.com/news/indone...210000426.html
                      Something from Reuters
                      [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Verdana]Some love to milk Apostate.[/FONT][/COLOR]

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by fastpitch17 View Post

                        Good.

                        I wish I had the time to listen and read the Indonesian media. I am sure it is all there. Last night on TV a spokesperson for Gerindra seemed to express strong disapproval of those students who go overseas to study. The audience of local uni students on his side of the debate enjoyed the comment. I hope I mis-heard. Does anyone have any more information on this?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by waarmstrong View Post
                          That would "was," not "is." A similar conclusion might be drawn from the fact that Hatta "is" the father in law of SBY's son. Could you therefore conclude that a Prabowo-Hatta administration is likely to be hesitant and wishy-washy?
                          Ah yeah I should have used was, nah he won't be hesitant and wishy-washy but most likely he will screw the poor and non Muslim community and create "Order Baru version 2.0". In case you doesn't know this guy have a solid reputation and credentials, the people backing him on this election even got better rep and credential. Perhaps the best one was when they accused the other guy guilty because he isn't a true Muslim. I'm not saying Jokowi is a champ, but well its between him and the guy who was Suharto's son in law.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by martindo View Post
                            Prabowo has a scary (but unproven) reputation among Chinese here, possibly related to (also unproven) rumors that he provoked May 1998 riots as an attempt to destabilize Reformasi and get Big Daddy back in the saddle. He headed special forces, not a regular army division, so it's hard to point to any specific actions he took in the field, one way or the other.
                            Retired Lt. Gen. Johny Lumintang had revealed years ago that Prabowo was NOT behind or responsible for the May 1998 Jakarta riots … http://www.minihub.org/siarlist/msg04563.html

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by fastpitch17 View Post
                              His actions in inviting in the likes of FPI are very questionable to me.
                              Prabowo must have learned something from Sun Tzu’s Art of War, if you can’t beat them, join them (allow them to join)… and “kill” them later.

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