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New Ministry of Education regulations - Indonesian culture, Pancasila, religion etc

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  • New Ministry of Education regulations - Indonesian culture, Pancasila, religion etc

    There have been recent changes in the curriculum for public schools and national plus schools in Indonesia. What do you think about these changes? Will there be less English taught? Will English just become an extra-curricular subject? Will the overall quality of education go down in Indonesia? What do you think were the underlying reasons for Dinas making these changes? What do you think about the new books.....the Termatik Series? Will there be any changes to curriculums in International schools? Will many English teachers lose their jobs?

    I teach English in a national plus school. To move on to an international school, is there anyway to get an application accepted with no teaching diploma but just a lot of teaching experience?
    Kitab Zabur @ https://www.facebook.com/Kitab-Zabur-891579940928940/

  • #2
    What exactly are the changes?

    What about National Plus schools which teach in English?

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    • #3
      The changes are happening slowly over the next 2 years in SDs throughout Indonesia, though some schools have already completely switched over to the new curriculum. There is a uniform curriculum which incoporates core subjects that Dinas has stated as being the best for SD students. English and sceince are no longer being deemed as core subjects and have been dropped from the compulsory curriculum. However, schools can retain these subjects by incorporating them into their extra-curricular programs. All the core subjects are put together into one textbook under themes. The core subjects have a new name: Termatik. You have 8 Termatik textbooks (combined workbooks) for one year. In 2 years time, the books will be given out free to every student in Indonesia. This program seems to only affect public SD and national plus SD. I don't know if there are any changes to the international curriculum so I was hoping to get some comments from someone 'inside'.
      Kitab Zabur @ https://www.facebook.com/Kitab-Zabur-891579940928940/

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      • #4
        According to wikipedia:

        "Some private schools refer to themselves as "national plus schools" which means that they intend to go beyond the minimum government requirements, especially with the use of English as medium of instruction or having an international-based curriculum instead of the national one."

        Will this no longer be allowed?

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        • #5
          I was hoping to get some principals to comment on exactly what you are asking. We may have to wait a few days and hope some principals are willing to share what they know or have heard. My understanding is that at my school, the principals will try to keep the teachers using oral English but in reality I don't think it will work well....isn't it easier to just use Bahasa to teach textbooks which only use Bahasa? Personally, I'm worried...and I'm making plans to get out and move to Jawa soon.
          Kitab Zabur @ https://www.facebook.com/Kitab-Zabur-891579940928940/

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          • #6
            I guess they can just translate the books into English.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Hong Xiuquan View Post
              There is a uniform curriculum which incoporates core subjects that Dinas has stated as being the best for SD students. English and sceince are no longer being deemed as core subjects and have been dropped from the compulsory curriculum. However, schools can retain these subjects by incorporating them into their extra-curricular programs.
              National PLUS schools, by definition, offer more than a single curriculum. The National (government) curriculum, PLUS additional subject instruction, generally meaning international curriculum such as IB, generally meaning that they offer, additionally to the National core, additional languages and / or subjects taught in other languages, such as English and Mandarin, which would be the case where I work.

              So in National PLUS schools, just because English is dropped from the Core curriculum, how is that gonna stop the schools from not only teaching English, but also continuing to teach other subjects (including Science, for example) using English as the primary (or sole) language of instruction? Just because they won't get free textbooks? That would make the difference to poorly funded government schools maybe, but Nat Plus schools are money-making enterprises.

              And at least in the case of the ones I know of, their bread is buttered in good part expressly by the fact that they do teach kids English (and / or Mandarin, etc) and acclimate them to learning in it. That is one of the reasons, if not THE primary reason, for parents to put their children in Nat Plus (or International) schools.

              Therefore, your conjecture / question doesn't really make sense to me. Why would these changes mean they will stop teaching English?
              Last edited by Mister Bule; 04-04-14, 21:46.
              [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Warden: "What we got here ... is failure to communicate."

              The Dude: "Oh yeah? Well that's just, like, your opinion, man."[/FONT]

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              • #8
                I think Mister clarified that aspect well. I would only add that the National Plus web site explicitly warns that "there is no definition of National Plus" in the sense of a minimum standard. AFAIK, it's not even required to use English as a *spoken* language of instruction.

                Regarding Hong's second paragraph/key question, I suggest approaching the newer international schools which may be more flexible. St. Andrews has started a branch in Batam (SD only) which I visited last week. There are also quite a few self-labeled international schools (grades 1-12) that have sprung up in Jakarta in the past decade and they are likely to be more flexible about teaching skill/credentials than "flag" schools like JIS, BIS, NZ, Aus, Japan, etc. international schools.

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                • #9
                  For public schools, there is a national curriculum but there are also local ("otonomi daerah") decisions, some of which run counter to the liberalization expected (or presumed) by NGOs who pushed for the autonomy. For example, in our kabupaten in Central Java, kids in first grade learn to read in the following sequence: Indonesian, English, Arabic, Javanese. Yes, you read that correctly: their native language comes fourth in the sequence. Those who are not Muslims don't get the Arabic classes, but those who are Muslims are taught Arabic alphabet before Javanese alphabet. When I mentioned this to an Indonesian friend who once ran an NGO in Jakarta, she was shocked and attributed it to decision-making at the kabupaten level (local dept of education).

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                  • #10
                    I can only comment on my school and it does seem that the owners are worried about the changes. They have set up an English course to cater for the students who will no longer be doing English classes doing regular school time. The course will open in July when new students start. They will switch over slowly. In July, Grade 1 and 4 will only be using the Termatik series. Their English classes will only be in the course, which will be after school. Dinas told my school that they can only teach 20 hours per week for each SD grade. In 2 years time, Dinas has said that my school must switch all SD students over completely to the Termatik curriculum. The Termatik curriculum is a Bahasa curriculum. It is a big change for my school as the primary language before was English but when the Termatik books are used then it will change to Indonesian being the primary language. I'm the only foreign teacher at my school and I can't see the other teachers wanting to translate every sentence twice in 2 languages, especially as no one is actually watching them teach. My daughter's school (a different one and not national-plus) has already completely changed over to the Termatik program. They still teach English once a week though.
                    Kitab Zabur @ https://www.facebook.com/Kitab-Zabur-891579940928940/

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                    • #11
                      What do you mean "after school"? Public schools in our part of Java have been offering "extra" classes in English, swimming, art, etc. after school for years. A couple years ago, I blinked, and the "extra" started to become effectively required. My younger daughter complains that the school day is too long now.

                      So, is it really a change for the courses about English language and literature, or just a shift in schedule? I realize it's a huge change in terms of the language of instruction for math, science, etc. from English to Bahasa.

                      Try to get your daughter into a bilingual SMP if you are using national schools. Ours loves the one she is in. I assume those won't be trashed by the new rule.

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                      • #12
                        Most of this discussion has focused on whether English and Science will still be a part of school curriculum.
                        However, there is another important aspect of the new curriculum. The reporting system is designed to produce bureaucracy on steroids. Final report for one student will consist of 50+ comments from all subject teachers (three comments per subject), plus a longer comment from a form teacher. This comes out to 5-6 pages per student, depending on the education level and paper size used for reports. Of course, don't forget that DINAS requires copies of everything, sometime double copies, and I am not talking about photocopies.

                        I suppose this is what they mean by 'character based curriculum', but in the end it is going to be a nightmare to manage. The amount of time teachers will spend trying to wrap up in(s)ane bureaucratic demands will be the time not spent to prepare lessons. Form teachers will be hit particularly hard and thus have less time to monitor and counsel their students. If you put all this together you get a general decline in education quality, it's not just a question of Science and English.

                        Some schools can soften the blow by integrating their administration online/via local intranet to produce automatically compiled reports. I have seen several types of software designed to handle this and my school is building a custom solution. As if on cue, local DINAS in Pekanbaru came out with the announcement that all reports need to be handwritten , but we'll probably ignore that.

                        School principals are pretty much universally stressed out and confused by new standards (at least 5-6 that my school consults with regularly). They have all spent serious money to send teacher delegates to compulsory government organized seminars where they were supposed to get clear information about Curriculum 2013 implementation. The teachers came back totally confused, apparently even the government is not sure how to implement this.
                        Last edited by Niko Z.; 19-04-14, 16:11.
                        Take my advice, I don't need it.

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                        • #13
                          Par for the course, really.

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                          • #14
                            Sigh, another example of how to make a system byzantine. I think testing was originally promoted here as a way to sift out smart kids in an environment where high grades were given to those who looked neat, smiled, didn't ask questions, and paid a "gift" when they received their report card. Now it's a national obsession.

                            Personalized evaluations are very valuable, but also very time-consuming as noted. I also wonder how many Indonesian teachers can actually write specific ones. We might just see "he/she is smart and understands the lessons" (or some variation showing the degree to which this has been achieved) repeated endlessly, with vagueness that makes it almost worthless.

                            I'd rather see serious attention devoted to making textbooks less error-prone. And in the remaining years (decades?) when testing is still supreme, make sure that the questions actually have unique answers. Designers of tests here seem to have a knack for creating wrong answers that are equally true as the right one.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by martindo View Post
                              Personalized evaluations are very valuable, but also very time-consuming as noted. I also wonder how many Indonesian teachers can actually write specific ones. We might just see "he/she is smart and understands the lessons" (or some variation showing the degree to which this has been achieved) repeated endlessly, with vagueness that makes it almost worthless.
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                              So many options

                              Lets face it, some teachers have upwards of 200 students to deal with, they are lucky if they can remember the kids' names by the end of the semester.
                              Last edited by Niko Z.; 22-04-14, 12:15.
                              Take my advice, I don't need it.

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