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  • Hard-Liners Attack Church in Yogya

    [FONT=arial]The new president of Indonesia apparently will provide some planes for Christian adherents in Java so they can worship in Manado. [/FONT][FONT=arial]
    [/FONT]



    Hard-Liners Attack Yogyakarta Church

    [COLOR=#999999][FONT=Georgia]By Camelia Pasandaran on 09:05 pm Jun 02, 2014
    Category Crime, News, Religion
    Tags: Indonesia religious intolerance, Yogyakarta crime
    [/FONT][/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica]Jakarta. A Christian group in Sleman district, Yogyakarta, has slammed the province’s law enforcement for failing to prevent a mob from attacking their church on Sunday, in the second such incident in less than a week there.
    Dozens of members of the Yogyakarta Islamic People’s Forum (FUI Yogyakarta) barged through the doors of El Shaddai Pentacostal Church (GPdI El Shaddai) in Pangukan village early on Sunday morning, hell-bent on stopping the weekly religious service.


    “The mob came and police asked us to stop the service,” said Rev. Jonathan Soeharto of GPdI Kuta in Bali, who was delivering the sermon in Pangukan when the incident occurred. “We shortened the service and the congregation left.”


    Sleman Police proceeded to line up outside the church, promising to protect the place of worship from further threats and disturbances.

    Yet several hours later a group of men garbed in white robes arrived and began attacking the building with stones and hammers, destroying its entrance, windows and doors.
    “Dozens of police officers were there, but they did nothing to stop it. They only watched [the mob] destroying the church,” said Jonathan, who is also head of Indonesia’s Pentecostal Church Association (PGPI) in Bali.
    The shortened morning service meant worshipers had already left when the violence started and no one was hurt in the assault. Still, the angry mob left a significant amount of destruction, pushing church officials to report the incident to the Yogyakarta Police on Monday.

    Adi Sukaja, secretary of the GPdI synod, told the Jakarta Globe the Pentecostal church had been operating without a permit for more than 20 years, guiding a congregation of some 250 members through Sunday services.
    T
    wo decades went by with no signs of friction or disagreements erupting between the church and its non-Christian neighbors — until 2011, when a Molotov cocktail landed on the roof, the resulting blaze charring parts of the building. Witnesses reported seeing two figures on a motorcycle racing away, but police have yet to find the perpetrators.

    During renovations the next year, church officials filed the necessary documents to obtain a valid permit, which only fueled the ire of the community’s hard-line Islamic citizens who rejected the move.
    “As it goes everywhere else, it’s not easy to get a permit,” Adi said.

    “It [the church] was sealed off by the government [in 2012] after it received pressure from intolerant groups, but the church appealed and recently won the case, allowing us to reopen our doors. GKI Yasmin had a similar experience,” he added, referring to the closing of a Bogor church whose permit was revoked by the city’s mayor despite a Supreme Court ruling allowing religious services to continue.
    The vandalism of GPdI El Shaddai occurred in the same week a Catholic prayer group was violently assaulted in the same district in Yogyakarta.

    According to the Yogyakarta Anti-Violence Society (Makaryo), the province has seen a recent spike in hate crimes, despite the fact its governor, Sultan Hamengku Buwono X, received an award for his ability to maintain pluralism in the region.

    The increasingly hostile string of attacks — and the unsolved nature of their cases — has raised concerns over whether the governor deserves the recognition.
    Five separate incidences of religious intolerance were reported in the province in May alone, the first occurring at the start of the month when the head of Gunungkidul’s Interfaith Forum was mobbed and beaten by members of the Islamic Jihad Front (FJI).

    The attackers later claimed Aminuddin Aziz, also a Muslim, deserved the “punishment” for defending Christians in the media. During police questioning, three of the detainees threatened to kill Aminuddin.
    The following week, FUI Yogyakarta — the same group allegedly responsible for the attack on GPdI El Shaddai — and FJI forcibly halted a Koran study group lead by a Shiite in the village of Sumberan.
    The final week of May saw three disturbances, the first being the assault on the Catholic prayer group, during which six members of the congregation suffered injuries, including a child who was reportedly electrocuted.
    Next came an FJI-led demonstration against the Javanese Christian Church (GKJ), prohibiting some 12,000 Christians from conducting its annual Easter celebration, despite the permit GKJ received from City Hall.
    FJI, with the support of several other hard-line Islamic organizations, accused the church of carrying out a “hidden agenda” of converting Muslims to Christianity.
    The month riddled with intolerance finally ended with the mob assault on GPdI El Shaddai on Sunday.

    Benny Susanto, coordinator of Makaryo, told the Globe he planned to report Yogyakarta’s governor as well as the district heads of Sleman, Bantul and Gunungkidul to the National Commission for Human Rights (Komnas HAM) for the rising number of cases of religious intolerance.

    “We want the Indonesian Interfaith Network to annul the pluralism award that was given to the governor,” Benny said. “Regardless of the [Islamic] groups’ motives or intentions, they do not allow others the freedom to worship the faith of their choice. The district heads have only encouraged the intolerance [by doing nothing].”
    Benny pointed out that the sultan himself had never issued a statement denouncing violence against minorities.

    “When we asked him about the cases, the governor merely replied he had texted the Yogyakarta Police chief regarding the matter. That’s not a sufficient answer. We want him to issue a public statement ordering the police to target the problem at its root,” he said.

    The coordinator also lamented what he called the central government’s role in Yogyakarta’s rising intolerance.

    “There’s national link in these cases; law enforcement officials in charge of maintaining safety in regions where religious clashes are common don’t take the matter seriously,” Benny said. “These hard-line groups are growing stronger because of the lack of law enforcement.”

    Elga Sarapung, director of Interfidei, which advocates for religious tolerance, told the Globe that government officials at all levels needed to set an example of acceptance toward all faith.
    “Some political figures act like members of intolerant groups, which hinders their ability to govern,” he said.

    http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/news/...akarta-church/[/FONT][/COLOR]
    Last edited by ponyexpress; 03-06-14, 16:58.

  • #2
    Very sad indeed.
    Things happen for a reason...

    Comment


    • #3
      From the article, since it won't allow me to quote pony's entire article, "[COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica]FJI, with the support of several other hard-line Islamic organizations, accused the church of carrying out a “hidden agenda” of converting Muslims to Christianity."

      [/FONT][/COLOR]
      [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica]That[/FONT][/COLOR] is decidedly not a hidden agenda, they are quite public with their hostile evangelism. Pentecostals, in Indonesia, uh huh. You do realize that these are the speaking in tongues [redacted], right?



      Anyway, the correct response to Christian [redacted], who speak in tongues, is to support all other religious affiliations to the exception of Christianity. Dharmic faiths in particular are good candidates for this, and they at least have some degree of pedigree in the archipelago without being the religion of the colonial overlords. Rebuild their temples, encourage their development and indeed the development of all faiths to the exception of Christianity. Deny Christians their martyr complex and they wither away and die, like they have in the West.
      Last edited by DanInAceh; 04-06-14, 09:14.

      Comment


      • #4
        So yes there are some Christian weirdoes (sic) out there but do they deserve to be treated like that? Dan however weird these people are, they don't come to people's house and smash their windows and beat up some people. But these hard-liners ransacked people's house and in another town of Central Java, they beat up some guys including a child.
        Last edited by ponyexpress; 05-06-14, 13:01.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ponyexpress View Post
          So yes there are some Christian weirdoes (sic) out there but do they deserve to be treated like that? Dan however weird these people are, they don't come to people's house and smash their windows and beat up some people. But these hard-liners ransacked people's house and in another town of Central Java, they beat up some guys including a child. Have you got any medals for your fellow hard-liners?
          I thought I made it pretty clear that they (the Muslims) were shooting themselves in the foot. Let me restate that for the record. Arson attacks, threats of violence, murder and so on are all terribly ineffective ways of preventing Christianity from taking root in an area. In fact, it probably encourages them. It validates their world view that they are the righteous and are being "tested" in their faith through various trials and tribulations. They get off on this kind of thing, it's the martyrdom that they crave above all else. This is true of all Abrahamic faiths.

          The antidote for Christianity, the most effective means of countering it, is to "hit them where it hurts." By that I mean developing stronger institutions than the ones they'll attempt to bring in. Christians have long preyed upon the destitute, so organizing religious charity from all other faiths is an effective means of countering their efforts. So too is establishing the validity of all other religions to the exception of Christianity. The Sultan would be wise to build more temples of other faiths and to encourage their development. None of the other faiths are an actual threat to Islam, so it's a token gesture that provides the cover of tolerance while simultaneously undermining Christianity.

          Also, I take exception to your characterization that I am a "hard-liner." Take it back.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by DanInAceh View Post
            I thought I made it pretty clear that they (the Muslims) were shooting themselves in the foot. Let me restate that for the record. Arson attacks, threats of violence, murder and so on are all terribly ineffective ways of preventing Christianity from taking root in an area. .
            Agree. But you seem to be implying that if these means were somehow "effective", you would support them. That's not the case, is it? Can we agree that arson, threats, and murder are not only "ineffective," but also just plain wrong?

            Comment


            • #7
              Every attack to non Muslim by a Muslim in Indonesia are all done by the one and only FPI. Amazing how this group has not been banned after all of these incident...... Mysterious hand is protecting them..

              This group is never about religion... It's about showing power and in the end, they will ask a fee for protection...


              I am sure many of you live here long enough, you should know by now that our country built on 'premanisme'.
              Last edited by Missnaughty; 03-06-14, 18:40.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Puspawarna View Post
                Agree. But you seem to be implying that if these means were somehow "effective", you would support them. That's not the case, is it? Can we agree that arson, threats, and murder are not only "ineffective," but also just plain wrong?
                Murder, arson and threats are wrong, yes. However, I will submit that there is sometimes a gray area or matter of perspective when it comes to violence or threats of violence. Violent acts directed at a hostile regime, as an example, may be effective and necessary. It should be clear that such acts against civilian targets is unacceptable (and such is congruent with the shari'a), but violence against the agents of the regime? That may be acceptable, depending on the circumstances. I believe quite firmly that there is a time to fight.

                When dealing with Christians in Jogja or anywhere else in the archipelago, it is best to simply undermine their efforts.

                Comment


                • #9
                  In the marketplace of religious ideas all should be allowed to set out their stall and present their ideas for consumption. Some religious folks seem to be of the opinion that people can't be trusted to make the 'correct' decision and therefore try to make it for them.
                  "[COLOR=#000000][FONT=Helvetica Neue]I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it.[/FONT][/COLOR]"
                  George Bernard Shaw

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Missnaughty View Post
                    Every attack to non Muslim by a Muslim in Indonesia are all done by the one and only FPI. Amazing how this group has not been banned after all of these incident...... Mysterious hand is protecting them..

                    This group is never about religion... It's about showing power and in the end, they will ask a fee for protection...

                    I am sure many of you live here long enough, you should know by now that our country built on 'premanisme'.
                    This is true, at least about the FPI. They probably have been infiltrated by preman. It probably is a shake down. However, not all of these people are preman. Some are, in fact, true believers. I don't think it's wise or accurate to completely wash our hands of the role that Islam itself plays in these attacks.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yes there are Christian weirdos and of course there Moslem weirdos too.

                      It's so sad that religion blind someone's humanity. I am speaking about the attackers and also anyone who supports it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by thediamond View Post
                        Yes there are Christian weirdos and of course there Moslem weirdos too.

                        It's so sad that religion blind someone's humanity. I am speaking about the attackers and also anyone who supports it.
                        Of course, there are weirdos on both side. That's why we shouldn't encourage them. Christians should be wary of the presence of Pentecostals in their midst. [redacted].
                        Last edited by DanInAceh; 04-06-14, 09:15.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          do they deserve this?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by thediamond View Post
                            do they deserve this?
                            No. See posts 5 and 8.

                            [redacted]
                            Last edited by DanInAceh; 04-06-14, 09:15.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DanInAceh View Post
                              No. See posts 5 and 8.

                              They're still boobs.
                              Boobs?

                              LOL.

                              Interesting term! In Australia that is a woman's breasts...

                              Sorry ... had to laugh.
                              Things happen for a reason...

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