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Tuition (fees) at JIS

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  • Tuition (fees) at JIS

    I don't want to see JIS closed, but as I have said previously, I am curious as to how they can set such high school fees and get them.

    I am forming a thesis on this but need a little more information. It may explain a small amount of the resentment of JIS that has been remarked on)

    The information I am seeking would include

    1. what is total enrolment?
    2. how many are students of teaching staff, and other staff, who may be subsidised or getting tuition free?
    3. how many have parents whose employer pays the bills as part of the employment package? (including diplomatic employers)
    4. do all students who pay full fees pay the same fee?

    I note that JIS is big and has economies of scale. This creates a barrier to competition. The barrier is in part due to its long reign and perhaps favourable treatment along the way, and a smooth path to a good reputation over the years (being set up with a special status)

    As I have noted, my thesis is not formed and hence publishable as yet

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by johntap; 22-04-14, 12:25.

  • #2
    Tuition at AIS and BIS is very similar to JIS tuition, so you might want to add those schools to your research project.

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    • #3
      Thank you. That is a good point.

      I do note that the school is to be closed. Immigration officials are also checking work permits today.

      I have a feeling I am going to have to dig deep to find answers.

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      • #4
        On further (economic) contemplation, one might suggest collusion - the existence of some agreement between the schools on fees.

        All of this is fair game to a Competition Commission. It would be too much for me even if assistance were forthcoming.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by johntap View Post
          I do note that the school is to be closed.
          That's a very upsetting message to read, but I assume you wouldn't post mere hearsay about something so serious. Can you be more specific - what is your source, on what date is JIS to be closed, is this a closure of all campuses or only select ones, and is the closure permanent or temporary?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by johntap View Post
            On further (economic) contemplation, one might suggest collusion - the existence of some agreement between the schools on fees.

            All of this is fair game to a Competition Commission. It would be too much for me even if assistance were forthcoming.
            Not only that, but the investigation could expand to other tiers of schools, and even other countries that have international schools along the lines of JIS and BIS. Obviously it's not a realistic endeavor, but if there were a way to finance it, I think the right gadfly could make a living for YEARS off of this topic (and in the process no start some good conversations about costs and responsibilities to the community, even if a school like JIS would most likely come up squeaky clean from a scandal standpoint).

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            • #7
              Puspa Re the closure I heard that on Metro. And TV One 30 mins ago. It was of course about as clear as the 6pm article in last night's Jak Post. as for "even if a school like JIS would most likely come up squeaky clean from a scandal standpoint" - I would hope so.

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              • #8
                Factors include teacher salaries, teacher work permits, housing, insurance, as part of the compensation package. This has been noted locally by expats in Batam regarding far lower tuition due to the use of teachers from Philippines and India who have good English skills but lower financial expectations. (The quip "Here you don't have to sell your first born in order to put your second child thru international school.")

                Other factors include facilities costs (including largish "capitalization fee" = pangkal in Bahasa), extracurricular activities such as sports competitions in other SE Asian countries as a routine part of participation in such a league of international schools (e.g., airfare and lodging).

                Puspa is correct about BIS and AIS having similar tuition. Consider German, French, and Japanese schools as well. At best "only" half of what JIS charges.

                John might want to subdivide Q3 and ask about % Indonesian students paying out of family's pocket compared to % foreign students/families doing the same.
                Last edited by martindo; 22-04-14, 13:22.

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                • #9
                  Basically, the purpose of a "flag" international school is to give citizen kids of those countries an education equivalent to what they'd get in a good school in their home country. This means plenty of equipment for sports, music, drama, as well as interscholastic competition, state of the art computers, AV equipment, etc. And of course highly skilled teachers willing to reside in a hot, crowded, polluted city. (A friend who taught at international school in South America said that competition for posts there or here is far less than at international schools in most of Europe.)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by johntap View Post
                    Puspa Re the closure I heard that on Metro. And TV One 30 mins ago. It was of course about as clear as the 6pm article in last night's Jak Post. as for "even if a school like JIS would most likely come up squeaky clean from a scandal standpoint" - I would hope so.
                    It would be a great kindness to the JIS community if you would in the future make your sources clear when you repeat unsubstantiated "news" of that sort. The media have printed much misinformation about this case, and this seems to be another instance of that. I realize you are not necessarily in a position to accurately judge whether this particular report is true. However, at least if you say "I just saw on Metro TV and other TV stations that the school is closed," people could judge for themselves whether they find the source trustworthy.

                    The parent portal of the JIS website mentions no such closure, and in fact specifically says that the school is remaining open. If this changes and I share information, I will be sure to make my source clear.
                    Last edited by Puspawarna; 22-04-14, 13:59.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by johntap View Post
                      "even if a school like JIS would most likely come up squeaky clean from a scandal standpoint" - I would hope so.
                      I'm glad we agree. The impression I had was that you thought an investigation would be a good way to dig up dirt, particularly since you mentioned "collusion" as a possible factor in the tuition.

                      Not to say there is no dirt, anywhere, ever, on any international school, in any tuition category, in any country. I'm sure there is. But on the whole I think it is possible to look around the JIS campus and see where the money is going. Martindo makes very good points, as well.

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                      • #12
                        Collusion is being used here in a strictly economic sense. It is illegal of course in this country to collude on prices etc. It is only one way to explain the supernormal profits (?) of at least the two big players in Jakarta. My research might reveal nothing of the sort. This topic has been a fascination of mine for a long time. I am not muckraking in the worst sense of the word.

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                        • #13
                          The distinction of local vs foreign tuition is also relevant to university tuition in US. There have been articles suggesting that rises are related to the increasing recruitment/interest of international students, who pay full tuition, thereby subsidizing American kids to some extent. Questions also arise among American families about whether they are getting their money's worth if some kids don't have the language skills for even minimum participation in class discussions.

                          In the case of K-12 schools overseas, the situation is reversed: the locals may be subsidizing the foreign/expat kids to some extent, because AFAIK the majority of the local kids are paying out of pocket.

                          I wouldn't call it collusion even in an economic sense. It's like setting up an elite golf club knowing that subsidies will occur, such as companies paying the fees. If you know the market/financing is there, the "cooperation" (or "collusion") of other clubs is not all that relevant.

                          I also know for a fact that some international schools have distinctly different ways of imposing non-tuition fees. Jakarta Japanese School, for example, charges an "entrance fee" per family, not per child.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by johntap View Post
                            Collusion is being used here in a strictly economic sense. It is illegal of course in this country to collude on prices etc. It is only one way to explain the supernormal profits (?) of at least the two big players in Jakarta. My research might reveal nothing of the sort. This topic has been a fascination of mine for a long time. I am not muckraking in the worst sense of the word.
                            Where does your information about "supernormal profits" come from?

                            BTW, I see that our friends the media are indeed reporting a JIS closure - but unless Metro was really sloppy, they must have mentioned that it is for ONLY kindergarten, and ONLY for the next school year, and ONLY if the paperwork issues are not resolved.

                            Not that I believe anything I read in the press. But that's what I'm seeing at the moment via a Google search. And just as the fact that the press said so doesn't make it true, it also doesn't make it false.

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                            • #15
                              It's worth mentioning (if not done earlier in the huge thread about the tragedy) that Kindergarten is a distinct term created when various western countries (e.g., Germany) decided to educate kids before first grade. Indonesian schools do NOT integrate kindergarten level into primary school -- the latter is strictly grades 1-6.

                              So it is understandable that Ministry of Ed views the kindergarten (and earlier grade/age levels) as PRE-school, thus a category different from grades 1-12. But if this view applies to international schools, I wonder how schools other than JIS got their kindergarten license and whether all of them actually have one. Any word on this?
                              Last edited by martindo; 22-04-14, 14:38.

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