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  • #61
    Originally posted by jstar View Post
    Nah Michelle, you're right of course; you just can't afford to put in a 100 hours for a certain dish. And I don't even have a sous-vide machine. I do miss a steamer over here though. (And the rice cooker is not ideal for that.)

    The problems here for me are:
    1. The temperature and humidity, I just can't stand to operate that long in these conditions. We have a layout that relies more on ventilation and not on aircons in living room & open kitchen.
    2. Sourcing of good ingredients at an acceptable price, almost impossible. Try to find some good veal or so. Or non sweetened natural yoghurt (okay, you can make that yourself).
    3. Competitive pricing local cuisine; it is actually cheaper to go out for dinner than to cook yourself. Especially Asian cuisine of course. And I do like Indonesian food as well.
    4. Culture and difference in taste; I was always taught, Salmon on the grill one minute each side, slightly tranparant inside. Here they freak out; it's raw, undercooked! Same with tuna, yes, even pork. They destroy everything by frying and wanting everything well-done.
    One day I'll up skill my cooking skills. One day...

    #1 I am usually in AC so very lucky, but kitchen AC is currently broken - again. Has huge bearing on what we have for tea!

    So agree with #2. I read so many recipes and just tick off what we can't get! Can usually substitute - but frustrating. I succumbed and did a lamb roast this week (husband's birthday). Man! Not cheap!! About $80 for 3kg boneless leg of lamb, $8 for Brussel sprouts, $3.50 for single swede, $6 for 2 sad parsnips, $12 for Australian sweet potato and [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Tahoma, Calibri, Geneva, sans-serif]plus local potatoes[/FONT]. Admittedly we've had cold meat for the rest of the week, but still - not cheap.

    And #3 yes is too true.

    #4 Have noticed same and not really realised it was a cultural/national approach. Interesting.
    Things happen for a reason...

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    • #62
      Originally posted by jstar View Post
      Nah Michelle, you're right of course; you just can't afford to put in a 100 hours for a certain dish. And I don't even have a sous-vide machine. I do miss a steamer over here though. (And the rice cooker is not ideal for that.)

      The problems here for me are:
      1. The temperature and humidity, I just can't stand to operate that long in these conditions. We have a layout that relies more on ventilation and not on aircons in living room & open kitchen.
      2. Sourcing of good ingredients at an acceptable price, almost impossible. Try to find some good veal or so. Or non sweetened natural yoghurt (okay, you can make that yourself).
      3. Competitive pricing local cuisine; it is actually cheaper to go out for dinner than to cook yourself. Especially Asian cuisine of course. And I do like Indonesian food as well.
      4. Culture and difference in taste; I was always taught, Salmon on the grill one minute each side, slightly tranparant inside. Here they freak out; it's raw, undercooked! Same with tuna, yes, even pork. They destroy everything by frying and wanting everything well-done.
      You will love my mother in law, she DEEP fry everything. It's the only cooking way she know
      La motivation vient en se motivant ~ Motivation come by self-motivation

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      • #63
        Originally posted by jstar View Post
        That probably explains her popularity with the general public. Well, let's be sexist and say the female half. And there's nothing wrong with that. But if cooking is your hobby, then you will outgrow her programs/books rather fast. Bit similar for Jamie Oliver. About other food & cooking shows: The MasterChef versions in Western Europe are much more educational than the US and Oz versions btw; you really see the candidates getting training and coaching.
        Originally posted by Michelle O'Brien View Post
        I can see why you say that, but for me - Mum with three kids - I will (in my current life stage) never yearn to temper chocolate or make spun sugar praline or highly technical techniques (yet. Maybe in a few years!)...I just don't have the time! And, I always have at least one kid at the table growling "yuck - I hate that"...most meal times!! Do you think I'm going to spend three hours souvide (?spelling) cooking something to get that reception for it!? No way!! I think there are many people in similar stage and hence their sustained popularity. And I've still not tired of their easy going styles of cooking. They're fresh, easy yet edgy. Donna Hay is along similar vein. She's Australian. Love her food - but don't watch her on TV. Atrocious on TV!!

        There's such a plethora of cooking shows to choose from.

        My my all time favourite though would have to be "The Two Fat Ladies". So politically-INcorrect. None of this low-fat anything crap! Lard! Butter! Double cream!! The more the better!!! Could I ever have eaten anything they made!? Never!! I'd just be sick it was all so rich!! But I just loved their joy for life, f^#knthe rest of them sort of attitude, and then after a beer and a fag they'd ride off on their motorbike! Priceless!!
        Is "popularity with the general public" a mild slur?; I suppose so, especially if you are a purist. Surprising that I find myself in tune with Michelle's comment, but her take on the subject mirrors my attitude. A show that resonates with most of us navigating through a multitude of daily tasks strikes me as a good thing.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by RomeoKawanua View Post
          Seriously ... If you are lonely woman and need someone to share/ talk ... Add my BBM Pin 7e9ac057
          wow! you're very kind! It's free, isn't it?

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