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  • #46
    Originally posted by Puspawarna View Post
    There is no difference in pronunciation of "p" between "loopy" and "happy," and that was my point - as native English speakers trying to learn Arabic, we find it hard to understand why a repeated consonant is such a big deal in Arabic, because in English it tends to be meaningless (or only affects the surrounding vowels, not the consonant pronunciation itself).

    But there is a huge difference between the sound of someone (with a native speaker accent) saying "Deep Purple" and the (imaginary but easily understood) word "de-purple." There are very clearly two "P" sounds in "Deep Purple." There is only one "p" in "depurple."

    Hearing the two "p" sounds right next to each other, and realizing what a huge difference it made, helped me to understand Arabic pronunciation rules better. That's all.
    That's clear. But I did wonder about 'manga and mangga'. I am not sure what manga is?

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    • #47
      I wasn't thinking of particular words, just "sound groups" that come up in Indonesian. "Manga" appears in words like semangat - I don't even remember whether that was what I thought of, or some other use of "manga". But that'll do! (Unless an actual Indonesian speaker knows a meaning for "manga." I don't.)

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      • #48
        I see, But is there a problem here? Is it semang-at; seman-gat or sema - ngat?

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        • #49
          Originally posted by johntap View Post
          But is there a problem here?
          If you want there to be, I'm sure you can find one Language is fun that way.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Puspawarna View Post
            If you want there to be, I'm sure you can find one Language is fun that way.
            Benar. Or as I say it, 'ber-nar". Maybe I should say 'memang'?

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            • #51
              Originally posted by johntap View Post
              I see, But is there a problem here? Is it semang-at; seman-gat or sema - ngat?
              Semangat is ambiguous, so it can either be se-ma-ngat or se-mang-at. When you use it in a sentence the difference is not noticeable. However, it's never se-man-gat or se-mang-gat.

              Kurungan (incarceration) is ku-rung-an, because it comes from the root word kurung (to cage).
              Pangan (food) is pa-ngan, because it comes from Javanese mangan (to eat).

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              • #52
                Oh my God!!! guuuuyysss........ you make Bahasa Indonesia is more complicated!!! all the responds are correct but... oh my...hhmmmmm.... I think I don't allow expats who are learning bahasa read this forum (I'm sure if you are learning bahasa and still read this forum, you will get headache soon. hahahaha) up to you then.....lol

                but please remember, bahasa is not as complicated as you think

                ..............................................................................
                Provides the Indonesian language course programs for expats in Indonesia (Private)

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                • #53
                  You are missing the point, Bahasa Teacher. Dissecting language details is a fun hobby for some people. The most enthusiastic students may very well be the ones who enjoy picking apart etymologies, pronunciation rules, and so forth.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by johntap View Post
                    I see, But is there a problem here? Is it semang-at; seman-gat or sema - ngat?
                    Years ago my elemantary teacher told us to spell 'semangat' as 'se-mang-at'. That way of spelling is rooted in my brain despite in colloquail language I always say 'se-ma-ngat'.
                    My husband finds words with 'ng*' (such as in 'pengalaman', 'pengertian', 'mengobati', etc.) are difficult to pronounce because I explained it the way my teacher did. I changed to spell it 'se-ma-ngat' and he can say it easier now.

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                    • #55
                      Thank you dragon fruit. Very helpful. I really hate saying 'keterangan', but now it seems informasi is good enough.

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                      • #56
                        Informasi is not always exactly parallel to keterangan. In everyday use keterangan is description, while informasi is, well, information.

                        Keterangan and its family fascinates me, because the root word is terang. Terang is an adjective encompassing light (opposite of dark), bright (opposite of dim), and clear (opposite of vague). Light as an object is cahaya. Keterangan in its most literal sense is illumination. Back in Soeharto's era there was a Departemen Penerangan, which was the Department of Enlightenment if translated literally. That institution evolved into today's Kementerian Komunikasi dan Informatika (Ministry of Communication and Informatics) because the old name was tainted, as it was the office that issued the press publishing license, which it revoked when a media company failed to toe the official line. It was so hated that the department was disbanded without any replacement in 1999, its successor didn't reappear until 2001.

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                        • #57
                          I've just found this link. I hope it's useful for anyone learning Bahasa Indonesia.

                          http://badanbahasa.kemdikbud.go.id/l...empurnakan.pdf

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                          • #58
                            Thank you merahputih..... I will learn it for myself
                            Provides the Indonesian language course programs for expats in Indonesia (Private)

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