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Translation challenge of the day! (Indonesian to English)

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  • Translation challenge of the day! (Indonesian to English)

    This isn't one of those horrific translations I usually write about, involving governance and viability gap funding and all those delightful concepts that make up the bulk of my work day - no, this one SHOULD be easy for anyone who is relatively knowledgeable in both Indonesian and English. The language is simple and we all know exactly what the author is talking about:

    Originally posted by Indonesian original text, about water sources for low income households in Indonesia
    Dan hampir setengah (48%) rumah tangga MBR mengaku air yang dibeli untuk kebutuhan minum berasal dari kios air isi ulang. Sisanya, 23% membeli air kemasan, 18% membeli air tetangga yang memiliki sambungan PDAM, 6% membeli air dari pedagang keliling, 3% dari pompa/hidran umum, dan 2% dari sumber mata air.
    But...how on earth can you say "pedagang keliling" in English, without having to write a lengthy explanation? The original translator used "roundsman" which, at least to me as an American, is completely opaque. The only reason I can figure out what "roundsman" means is because I know what "pedagang keliling" are.

    Anyway, I came up with a phrase that is short and sweet and I think covers it. But before I tell you what it is, I'm curious how other people would translate "pedagang keliling". Maybe you can come up with something better! (Maybe there is a standard term in the development world, and I just don't know it. If that's the case, I sure hope it isn't "roundsman" - I refuse to use that!)
    Last edited by Puspawarna; 10-06-14, 17:30.

  • #2
    Pedagang keliling = door to door salesman?
    Lost in Jakarta's trafic jam

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    • #3
      Good one! It's not what I thought of - I like mine slightly better, because in America the door-to-door people usually knock on your door to try to convince you to buy something you don't really need. However, I could definitely see using that.

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      • #4
        Hahaha yeah pedagang keliling use some yells or bell or another tools to make sound. I'm curious what your word is
        Lost in Jakarta's trafic jam

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        • #5
          travelling salesman.foot salesman....and when you have got all your answers can someone please help me in translating or making Indonesians understand what ''your welcome'' means,and I don't mean ''sama sama''

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          • #6
            My solution is two words long...I'll post it tomorrow.

            Hmm. For practical purposes, "You're welcome" does mean sama-sama or kembali - it's all just being gracious, in any language.

            But literally speaking, "You're welcome" is shorthand for "I gladly made the effort/did the thing for which you are thanking me - you should feel free to take it/enjoy the benefits, because I want you to have them."

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            • #7
              Now it sounds like a riddle....two words hmmm....I'm thinking xxxxxx-sales or xxxxxx-man hmmm
              Lost in Jakarta's trafic jam

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Puspawarna View Post
                My solution is two words long...I'll post it tomorrow.

                Hmm. For practical purposes, "You're welcome" does mean sama-sama or kembali - it's all just being gracious, in any language.

                But literally speaking, "You're welcome" is shorthand for "I gladly made the effort/did the thing for which you are thanking me - you should feel free to take it/enjoy the benefits, because I want you to have them."
                Thanks for your answer,I think

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                • #9
                  I believe the equivalent term in English is traveling vendor.

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                  • #10
                    barefoot trader

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                    • #11
                      Wandering trader hehehe
                      Lost in Jakarta's trafic jam

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by brodee View Post
                        Thanks for your answer,I think
                        Too long? That's why we just say "you're welome."

                        Well, that and the fact no one thinks about the precise meaning anyway when they say it. It's just a social nicety meant to show goodwill.

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                        • #13
                          There are a couple of replies to 'thank you' that have no direct translation into Indonesian: you're welcome and it's my pleasure. It's interesting that all the Indonesian replies can be shortly translated into English. Sama-sama is "likewise", kembali is "back at you", and nggak apa apa is "it's nothing".

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Puspawarna View Post
                            Too long? That's why we just say "you're welome."

                            Well, that and the fact no one thinks about the precise meaning anyway when they say it. It's just a social nicety meant to show goodwill.
                            no you're right. It's just that they ask me what it means and I can't explain it,. welcome means come with health I think,but why would we say that after thank you .Sorry thinking too literally!..Other words drive me nuts too,like "the".

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Nimbus View Post
                              There are a couple of replies to 'thank you' that have no direct translation into Indonesian: you're welcome and it's my pleasure. It's interesting that all the Indonesian replies can be shortly translated into English. Sama-sama is "likewise", kembali is "back at you", and nggak apa apa is "it's nothing".
                              I've had some misunderstandings after saying 'kembali' in shops,like I'm waiting for change..

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