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How to translate "Climb" into Bahasa

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  • How to translate "Climb" into Bahasa

    I'm trying to work out how to translate the verb "to climb" into Bahasa, other than using "naik".

    I heard someone say Manjat, so I checked in my small Tuttle dictionary and it has "memanjat".So far so good. I then checked google translate which says "menanjak" but doesn't mention "memanjat".

    Then the really strange thing is I checked my large Indonesian-English dictionary (the biggest one around - Echols&Shadily) and none of those words seem to exist.

    manjat - nothing
    memanjat - nothing
    nanjak - nothing
    menanjak - nothing

    so now I'm confused. Is Manjat a word or not? How would you translate "climb" other than using "naik".

    e.g. "the baby likes climbing up furniture"
    "he's climbed several mountains in the last few years"

  • #2
    lil bit help

    for original meaning is panjat (dictionary), and to climb is memanjat, but indonesian slang is manjat. so you can use manjat or panjat for climb and also you can use naik for climb.
    example: climb a wall - panjat or manjat sebuah tembok.
    climb a wall - menaiki sebuah tembok
    to climb a wall - memanjat sebuah tembok.

    almost same meaning, hope it can help you

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    • #3
      Thanks - it's in the dictionary under "panjat" not "manjat"!

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      • #4
        in dictionary is panjat, because in indonesian affixes Me- with first letter k,t,s,p will be omitted.
        example: original: panjat
        affixes: Memanjat
        that's like that. you have to learn more about affixes hihi
        ur welcome

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        • #5
          Always used manjat or memanjat. , but never heard it pronounced Panjat

          A lot of words are like that, after this long i still dont know if the right word is kharwatir or hawatir (worry) have heard it pronounced both ways and spelt both ways.
          confusedbule.com

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          • #6
            Panjat tebing, panjat pinang... As ranran said, its the original word before it meets any affixes.

            Aku gak khawatir kamu gak ngerti mister confusedbule.
            Words can inspire, thoughts can provoke, but only action can get you closer to your dreams.

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            • #7
              "Indonesian Reference Grammar" by James N Sneddon is a very helpful guide. He groups verbs by their prefix(?) and relates this to the initial letter of the root and the type of word the root is - I'm not explaining this very well and I no longer have a copy to which to refer. Nevertheless highly recommended.

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              • #8
                Now this is weird - I always thought that to climb a mountain was "mendadaki", with the root "dadak."

                It seems this is gibberish - "dadak" means "sudden", "mendadak" seems to be translated as "impromptu", and there is simply no such thing as "mendadaki."

                Well, that's a surprise. I wonder what people have thought when I've earnestly said things like, "O ya, besok ada rencana, mendadaki bukit di Sentul kalau tidak hujan."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Puspawarna View Post
                  Now this is weird - I always thought that to climb a mountain was "mendadaki", with the root "dadak."

                  It seems this is gibberish - "dadak" means "sudden", "mendadak" seems to be translated as "impromptu", and there is simply no such thing as "mendadaki."

                  Well, that's a surprise. I wonder what people have thought when I've earnestly said things like, "O ya, besok ada rencana, mendadaki bukit di Sentul kalau tidak hujan."
                  Salam kenal puspawarna, I love your username.

                  You are correct, no word mendadaki.
                  Mendaki (verb) is to climb.
                  Mendadak (adverb) is sudden/impromptu.
                  Maybe we all can check this for mendaki/daki and this for mendadak/dadak.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As little as I know, I've learned that literal translation often does not work. For example, "barang kali" is "maybe", but the two words translate literally to "stuff time". What is stuff time, and how / why is that maybe? I don't know. Barang kali seseorang lebih pintar bisa menjawab ini buat Mister bingungBule. Atau "tidak bisa, tidak mungkin, tidak boleh"...?
                    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Warden: "What we got here ... is failure to communicate."

                    The Dude: "Oh yeah? Well that's just, like, your opinion, man."[/FONT]

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                    • #11
                      I have now been told that if you're talking about a baby climbing a chair you can use manjat whereas if you're talking about climbing mountains it should be mendaki

                      makes sense to me (sort of)

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by whatever View Post
                        Salam kenal puspawarna, I love your username.

                        You are correct, no word mendadaki.
                        Mendaki (verb) is to climb.
                        Mendadak (adverb) is sudden/impromptu.
                        Maybe we all can check this for mendaki/daki and this for mendadak/dadak.
                        Oh, I see what happened - I just accidentally added an extra syllable to "mendaki."

                        so probably I just sounded like I was stuttering...

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                        • #13
                          Mister Bule,

                          That's right, literal translation often doesn't work.
                          It happens with other languages too, especially when it comes to idioms/sayings.
                          Talking about barang ...
                          We have "barang siapa yang ..." means, "those who ..."
                          To be honest, I don't know how/why/when this happened. Now I'm curious and I think I'll ask someone from Indonesian department in my campus.

                          Berlarutlarut,

                          What you've been told is true.
                          Here I give you some more phrase:
                          Manjat pohon/kursi/meja or naik ke kursi/meja: climbing a tree/chair/table,
                          Panjat tebing/dinding: wall climbing (sports)
                          Naik gunung: informal
                          Mendaki gunung: formal
                          Last edited by whatever; 06-02-14, 22:21.

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                          • #14
                            Memanjat has a more vertical sense than mendaki, even though they both mean upward motion. It's like the difference between an elevator and an escalator.

                            Panjat tebing literally means cliff climbing, the common term in English is rock climbing.
                            Mendaki gunung means to climb a mountain. Since the process is gradual 'daki' is used instead.

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                            • #15
                              OK thanks Nimbus, that clears it up for me.

                              Now, how can I remember these two unmemorable words.

                              Mendaki - rhymes (sort of ) with Kentucky. I'd climb a mountain to escape having to eat KFC.
                              Manjat - like manja (spoilt) with a T at the end, A spoilt child should be forced to climb up to the table to get her tea.

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