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New Manpower Law Requiring Indonesian Language Proficiency Test of Foreign Workers

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  • Puspawarna
    replied
    Originally posted by bbartz55 View Post
    My husband and I will be moving to Jakarta soon. We are in the process of applying for a visa to volunteer with an NGO. Does anyone have an update on the language proficiency test which was supposed to be decided on in February? I am learning Bahasa Indonesia online, but think it would be difficult to pass a proficiency test BEFORE moving to the country. Just wondering if anyone has more information on this.
    See the post directly before yours (#77) and click on the link to the Jakarta Globe article for more info.

    Leave a comment:


  • PhilippeD
    replied
    Nothing will change on how thing are presently: no need to be fluent prior arriving in indo.

    But, still, the law mention we should learn bahasa and it can affect your relation with imigration and manpower on a long term basis if you don't (very relatif)

    Leave a comment:


  • bbartz55
    replied
    My husband and I will be moving to Jakarta soon. We are in the process of applying for a visa to volunteer with an NGO. Does anyone have an update on the language proficiency test which was supposed to be decided on in February? I am learning Bahasa Indonesia online, but think it would be difficult to pass a proficiency test BEFORE moving to the country. Just wondering if anyone has more information on this.

    Leave a comment:


  • lantern
    replied
    I just came across this:

    [SIZE=2]"[COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica] Indonesia will withdraw a plan that would force foreign workers to take local language proficiency exams after protests from investors, two government officials said.[/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica][SIZE=2]Manpower Minister Muhammad Hanif Dhakiri earlier this month told reporters the government would require existing and prospective foreigners to pass Indonesian language tests to work in the country, a move seen by many foreign investors as protectionist.[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Helvetica][SIZE=2]Currently, foreigners do not have to speak Indonesian to receive a work permit for Southeast Asia’s largest economy".
    [/SIZE]http://thejakartaglobe.beritasatu.com/news/indonesia-withdraw-local-language-plan-foreign-workers-sources/[/FONT][/COLOR]

    Leave a comment:


  • Missnaughty
    replied
    .. if our leaders can think 2-3 step ahead, we wouldn't have any banjir in Jakarta...

    Leave a comment:


  • Kroshka2007
    replied
    ... yes I agree, but would think that those kind of thoughts should have gone through their minds before they launch such an initiative

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  • Missnaughty
    replied
    Originally posted by Kroshka2007 View Post
    could seem like they have changed their minds...

    http://thejakartaglobe.beritasatu.co...rkers-sources/
    Off course! The regulation is silly. If I were a Chinese investor and want to put my money here, absolutely I want my trusted person to watch my investment. If I can't put my people here, then I moved my money somewhere else. If bahasa Indonesia is really necessary I hire Indonesians instead...

    Leave a comment:


  • Kroshka2007
    replied
    could seem like they have changed their minds...

    http://thejakartaglobe.beritasatu.co...rkers-sources/

    Leave a comment:


  • dafluff
    replied
    Moderator note:
    A few posts that were off topic and mainly dealing with illegal immigration in the US have been moved to a different thread in order to keep this thread on topic.


    If you wish to continue that discussion, the new thread is here: http://www.livinginindonesiaforum.or...(moved-thread)

    Please keep the discussion in this thread related to New Manpower Law Requiring Indonesian Language Proficiency Test of Foreign Workers (as in the title), particularly since it is in the Laws, Visas, Money Matters and Documents forum.
    Last edited by dafluff; 28-01-15, 16:41.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jaime C
    replied
    I really don't find any resentment of Westerners in my time in Indonesia. Sure, some may try to charge you higher prices, but that happens to me all around the world. I don't work in Indonesia, though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hummingbird.1968
    replied
    If you are working for an oil company, they will probably shell out $ for language lessons - at least they did.


    I only read the last couple pages, does that mean they prefer their professionals to come from Thailand or other Asian countries instead of Western countries? Is there a specific reason for that (perhaps they are more culturally alike) or is that anti-Western sentiment....which was widespread the last time I was there? After rereading that ASEAN thing, it looks like Thailand has a leg up, the tests are only given in Thai?! I also take it that pharmacy is still not a recognized health profession over there?
    Last edited by Hummingbird.1968; 28-01-15, 08:37.

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  • akubrahat
    replied
    Originally posted by Jaime C View Post

    Unless it's in oil or mining, you'll probably need some fancy credentials, and most likely work for some big multinational company.

    .
    You will need the fancy credentials for that too, and some experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tony Gahegan
    replied
    I heard about the language test being brought in this year and am a little worried by it. I have been here less than a year and haven't learnt much yet as I work with native English speakers and socialise with Indonesians who can speak English, which has made me a little lazy.

    Does anyone know what level of competence is expected in the testing?

    Also, I recently heard that some other rules, which have not really been enforced up to now will become more strict. Basically that English teachers will need to have an actual Degree in English language rather than just a teaching qualification, and also that you will be required to get a blood test for drugs and AIDS which needs to be performed in your home country.

    The drug test seems crazy, do they really expect me to fly to the UK for a blood test and come back again?

    I don't know how worried I should be about these rules because I had already heard they existed but weren't being followed, but I know some teachers are now looking for work in different countries.

    Overall I don't see the point of placing these barriers to employment. As a country, if you have qualified native speakers who are willing to come to your country and teach your children it should be embraced. Making the laws more strict will deprive the students of their access to native speakers in the classroom, but will also force some teachers to teach illegally which will then deprive the government of the IMTA for each of those teachers.

    As for the language test, I think that is also misguided. I agree that foreigners who move into a country should try to learn the local language, but expecting them to be able to speak it before they arrive will deter a lot of prospective workers who could help improve the country. I have spent time working in a few different countries and I learned the local language after I had arrived, I don't see what is wrong with that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jaime C
    replied
    Originally posted by Happyman View Post
    That's a decent wage... Are there openings available? Is this a "selling your body" sort of thing? Because, to be honest, the only thing I am willing to part with is one broken toe. It's still a nice toe though, comes with a rag. Are there openings available for my toe in the mining industry?
    Look for jobs that offer to pay for your kids education at JIS, BIS, etc. If they're willing to shell out 25k a kid for school, they'll often be providing a driver, 3k a month house and a fat paycheck, too.

    Unless it's in oil or mining, you'll probably need some fancy credentials, and most likely work for some big multinational company.

    I'm not much interested in corporate stuff. I'd rather be able to spend most of my time with my family.

    Leave a comment:


  • Happyman
    replied
    Originally posted by akubrahat View Post
    This is what Thailand intends to do. It is not confined to Indonesia.

    [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Open Sans]The ASEAN Economic Community does not allow the free flow of skilled labor or service providers. Only certain professions that ASEAN members have mutually agreed are allowed to work freely across country boundaries. All members of the ASEAN have to sign Mutual Recognition Agreements to jointly recognize professional qualifications of its citizens. There has been difficulty in negotiating the agreements. The agreement set a target of fifty-two professions to be liberalized by 2015 but Mutual Recognition Agreements have only been signed for seven professions: engineers, nurses, physicians, dentist, architects, surveyors, and accountants.[/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#333333][FONT=Open Sans]While there can be no impediments to foreigners in the AEC professions, those professional have to abide by local regulations. This means that the individuals are required to pass local licensure and certification laws. In Thailand, all of the AEC professions require licensure. The test for licensure is only available in Thai language. This is a serious impediment to most foreign nationals from being licensed or qualifying as a recognized AEC professional in Thailand.[/FONT][/COLOR]
    So it's just a show... saying they welcome development through worker exchange, then making it impossible for foreign workers to comply with local regulations. I would wonder though, why Thailand and Indonesia would exchange [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Open Sans]engineers, nurses, physicians, dentist, architects, surveyors, and accountants[/FONT][/COLOR]. Is there really such a difference in ability between a Thai accountant and an Indonesian one? If you have "more developed" countries taking part, would the flow be one way?

    Leave a comment:

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