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Air quality in indonesia - particularly jakarta

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  • #16
    Originally posted by wisnupurwanto View Post
    Never heard about nuclear power plant in Serpong. The one in serpong is small plant for research and produce radioisotope. Technically Serpong is not suitable for a nuclear power plant - too far from water source, too close from large community.
    Well, it seems BATAN had other plans. Don't forget they made proposals in 1980 for a nuclear powerplant and a decade or so later they even proposed 12 reactors country wide!

    There are still plans for Serpong.

    http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Co...G-N/Indonesia/

    One quote:

    [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Arial]In December 2013, on the 55th anniversary of founding BATAN, the minister said that a non-commercial power reactor (RDNK) and a gamma irradiation facility would be built by BATAN at Serpong, the site of its largest research reactor, and in February 2014 he was quoted as saying that a 30 MW experimental nuclear power reactor would be built by BATAN at Serpong, near Jakarta.[/FONT][/COLOR]

    So it looks like they still want to expand the reseach facilities as well:

    [COLOR=#848484][FONT=PT Sans]The head of The National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) in Indonesia, Djarot Sulistio Wisnusubroto requests the government under President Joko ‘Jokowi’ Widodo and his Vice Jusuf Kalla to consider the plan on building mini non- commercial Nuclear Power Plants (PLTN) at Serpong, South Tangerang, Banten. The development of mini reactors in Indonesia will allow for the community’s acceptance and awareness of the need for nuclear energy to meet and fulfil the electricity needs in Indonesia.[/FONT][/COLOR]
    Last edited by jstar; 20-07-15, 14:51.
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    • #17
      So it will be like The White House, with guided tours?

      http://en.tempo.co/read/news/2015/04...tor-in-Serpong

      As far as I know, but Wisnu can correct me, currently (as of 1988/1992) they use the Serpong reactor for research of course, but also for the processing of (radioactive) waste and to produce radio-isotopes for food preservation. I'm not sure if they ever used those in the medical field over here. (Mainly for diagnostics; what they put in your body to trace fluid flows, so the blood stream but also fractures etc.)
      Last edited by jstar; 20-07-15, 14:46. Reason: added
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      • #18
        Originally posted by jstar View Post
        Well, it seems BATAN had other plans. Don't forget they made proposals in 1980 for a nuclear powerplant and a decade or so later they even proposed 12 reactors country wide!

        There are still plans for Serpong.

        http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Co...G-N/Indonesia/

        One quote:




        So it looks like they still want to expand the reseach facilities as well:
        Nope, experimental nuclear power reactor (10 MW or even 30 MW - this figures are the thermal power not generated electricity) is not a real power plant generating electricity to external users.
        Still, the main objective is for R&D, gamma irradiation and producing isotop commercially.
        I respect to Djarot (he's same dept . with me in university, a year earlier) but I doubt another reactor will be built at Serpong in near future, although I heard a Russian consortium is chasing for some works.

        Indeed, there's was a big plan in 1980 - and even now - to build nuclear power plants in Indonesia. Whether commercially and politically realistic for now is different story.
        Last edited by wisnupurwanto; 20-07-15, 16:17. Reason: added info

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        • #19
          Originally posted by johntap View Post
          Hi

          I've seen their facebook page, https://web.facebook.com/pages/Badan...02052763152943, but

          What does actually happen at BATAN, on a daily basis? Nice campus that is for sure.

          [COLOR=#141823][FONT=helvetica]
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          [COLOR=#141823][FONT=helvetica][COLOR=#ffffff]Badan Tenaga Nuklir Nasional

          [COLOR=#00e000]Lembaga Pemerintah[/COLOR]
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          Nuclear technology is not only power generation / nuclear power plant and atomic bombs. There's more lot of nuclear application used in our life, incl. but not limited on agricultural, material processing, medical, forestry, hydrology and many more
          Indonesia is one of several countries in the worlds that produce and export radio isotop for medical application

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          • #20
            Currently, there's three nuclear reactors in Indonesia, ie. Yogyakarta, Bandung and Serpong. I'm not sure Serpong commercially produced radioisotope for medical field now. I think most of commercial production is from Bandung by PT Industri Nuklir Indonesia

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            • #21
              I once visited (as part of a pharmaceutical intercompany working group) the nuclear reactor in Petten (The Netherlands) where they also produce the radio-isotopes. There are in fact two reactors (45 & 30 MW); they supply the majority of the European medical demand. Quite impressive.
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              • #22
                Originally posted by wisnupurwanto View Post
                Currently, there's three nuclear reactors in Indonesia, ie. Yogyakarta, Bandung and Serpong. I'm not sure Serpong commercially produced radioisotope for medical field now. I think most of commercial production is from Bandung by PT Industri Nuklir Indonesia
                Having just read that why does Homer Simpson spring to mind ???

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                • #23
                  [COLOR=#000000][FONT=Arial]Jakarta accounts for around 40 percent of all auto sales in Indonesia; more than 480,000 new cars hit the capital's streets in 2014, in addition to 1.4 million new motorcycles, according to the Association of Indonesian Automotive Manufacturers.
                  [/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#000000][FONT=Arial]and
                  The ministry estimates that at least 70 per cent of Jakarta air pollution is from vehicles. The main peril to public health is from fine particle pollution - measuring 2.5 micrometers in diameter or smaller and found in, among other things, auto emissions - that can sneak into people's nasal passages and lungs. Such pollution particles are significantly smaller than mould spores, pollens or typical atmospheric dust.


                  Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/world/jakartas...#ixzz3muXfLiHF
                  Follow us: @smh on Twitter | sydneymorningherald on Facebook[/FONT][/COLOR]

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                  • #24
                    They could have used this (lost) revenue to clean up the air.

                    [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Arial]Millions of vehicle owners in Jakarta reportedly missed paying the annual re-registration tax, leading to a potential loss of Rp 1.2 trillion (US$82 million) for the city's tax collection income, the tax office reported.
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                    [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Arial]Jakarta Tax Agency head Agus Bambang urged Jakartan citizens to re-register their vehicles as scheduled, adding that there are 8.5 million vehicles in the capital city, consisting of 6.2 million motorcycles and 2.3 million cars.[/FONT][/COLOR]
                    [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Arial]"There are 3.2 million motorcycles and 400,000 cars in Jakarta that have not been re-registered for more than one year, " Agus said as quoted by kompas.com.[/FONT][/COLOR]
                    [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Arial]- See more at: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2....5TacAKFD.dpuf[/FONT][/COLOR]

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                    • #25
                      [QUOTE=johntap;466208]They could have used this (lost) revenue to clean up the air.

                      [COLOR=#333333][FONT=Arial]"There are 3.2 million motorcycles and 400,000 cars in Jakarta that have not been re-registered for more than one year, " Agus said as quoted by kompas.com.

                      [/FONT][/COLOR]But Jakartas finest are getting fatter each year!!!!

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                      • #26
                        Maybe adding this re registration tax cost into fuel cost will stop having so many motors / cars on the roads of Jakarta and the air would be more clean. You can also introduce the congestion fee charge and use all that money to make Jakarta look more green eg. plans some more trees.

                        Imagine Jakarta with 50% less motors and 20% less cars.

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                        • #27
                          Goverment already take many step to reduce polution in Jakarta. But that's doesnt enough. We have to manage ourselves. Take actions to make our city be a better place. Maybe we can hold some event like clean Jakarta? every monday? we gather people from facebook or twitter? Maybe they can interest

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by johntap View Post
                            Is the air quality getting worse in Jakarta? If so, is it only cyclical, or worse? If it is a worsening problem, then what exactly is causing it?

                            I ask this because, for the first time in many years in Jakarta, I find myself sneezing and having a "heavy head", which does not end up becoming a cold or flu.

                            I have lived (briefly) in Cairo and Mexico City (years ago), and in these very dirty cities, the worst I got was conjunctivitis. I have never been to Beijing or the Pearl River delta to further test my observations. (I have never had a single allergic reaction in my life, that I am aware of.)

                            About 10 years ago, if I remember rightly, BAPEDAL? launched a Blue Skies policy and air quality figures were posted daily in newspapers and on a billboard in Sudirman. This practice didn't seem to last long.


                            Does anyone know if any group or government agency is currently concerned about air quality, and doing something about it?

                            hello John,

                            i had similar issues when lived in Cairo also (September and October are peak pollution month). Jakarta is a slightly better due to rain (few weeks to go i hope). In Cairo i tried to avoid being in the city in weekends and spend it as far away as possible. It was like a detox weekend. Perhaps this can be an option while you are in Jakarta. 1000 islands perhaps or in the highlands.

                            cheers

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