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Do foreigners get preferential treatment in JKT?

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  • Do foreigners get preferential treatment in JKT?

    ...particularly in government offices and businesses?

    Tends to be the case in some parts of the world... wondering if it is the case in Jakarta.
    Like for instance, because you look non-Indonesian, you would get more respect and amped up "customer service" and whatever service you're there for would be streamlined, while the commoners would have to take a number and rot.

  • #2
    Happens to me all the time because I dress like a religious Muslim. I get to cut lines and people go out of their way to kiss my hand. I find that part annoying. Also my baby looks foreign so women who work wherever generally want to play with her. This comes in handy when at immigration, the bank, local gov offices, etc.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Shaheed Griffin View Post
      Happens to me all the time because I dress like a religious Muslim. I get to cut lines and people go out of their way to kiss my hand. I find that part annoying. Also my baby looks foreign so women who work wherever generally want to play with her. This comes in handy when at immigration, the bank, local gov offices, etc.

      I agree with Shaheed ..if you are Muslim

      I am also Muslim, my wife wears niqabi, and in Indonesia I am not treated like a foreigner, and whether one might be Arab Muslim, Caucasian Muslim or any other Muslim (Islam is color blind) I have experienced the same thing as Shaheed. Preferential treatment at medical clinics, customs, visa processing or anything actually. A Muslim can spot another Muslim regardless of where they are from, in Indonesia and Malaysia I have been asked in immigration, and they speed you through priority. It helps alot not being grouped in with usual foreigners.
      Last edited by Saifislam; 1 week ago.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Saifislam View Post


        I agree with Shaheed ..if you are Muslim

        I am also Muslim, my wife wears niqabi, and in Indonesia I am not treated like a foreigner, and whether one might be Arab Muslim, Caucasian Muslim or any other Muslim (Islam is color blind) I have experienced the same thing as Shaheed. Preferential treatment at medical clinics, customs, visa processing or anything actually. A Muslim can spot another Muslim regardless of where they are from, in Indonesia and Malaysia I have been asked in immigration, and they speed you through priority. It helps alot not being grouped in with usual foreigners.

        Foreign muslims get treated very well here. Even my Nigerian, Ghana and Tanzanian friends love Indonesia because people do not care if they are black and they also get to cut lines or get extra help.

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        • #5
          Muslim or not, if you cut in line (I note that the Indonesian tradition is to form a scrum rather than an orderly cue; but that's another story) or accept other undeserved preferential treatments, you are assuming the role of the arrogant bule, the Ugly American.

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          • #6
            I agree , queuing is an indication of good manners , unfortunately I have lived and worked in too many countries where these indications of good behavior were lacking .

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            • #7
              Originally posted by waarmstrong View Post
              Muslim or not, if you cut in line (I note that the Indonesian tradition is to form a scrum rather than an orderly cue; but that's another story) or accept other undeserved preferential treatments, you are assuming the role of the arrogant bule, the Ugly American.
              I never have seen an american in Indonesia . But then again I would never visit Bali. But I imagine even an american Muslim will be treated better as well. Not thier fault. Muslims see Islam before a passport, that is a fact.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Saifislam View Post

                I never have seen an american in Indonesia . But then again I would never visit Bali. But I imagine even an american Muslim will be treated better as well. Not thier fault. Muslims see Islam before a passport, that is a fact.
                You need to get out more. I am not taking about Indonesian behavior or views, but rather how expats respond. How they respond is a choice and if they butt in line or otherwise behave arrogantly, its on them.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by waarmstrong View Post

                  You need to get out more. I am not taking about Indonesian behavior or views, but rather how expats respond. How they respond is a choice and if they butt in line or otherwise behave arrogantly, its on them.
                  If offered perks by a government official it would be rude to decline. Being a non muslim expat is not my problem, nor do I care what they think. Muslims see only islam., Not nationality. I'm not white euro so that helps

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                  • #10
                    The thread was titled , to get back on topic Do foreigners get preferential treatment in JKT?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by waarmstrong View Post

                      You need to get out more. I am not taking about Indonesian behavior or views, but rather how expats respond. How they respond is a choice and if they butt in line or otherwise behave arrogantly, its on them.
                      I would never ask to cut the line unless I had a crying baby with me or there was a few hours waiting time. My baby is 1.5 and hyper, plus Indonesian rules is those with small baby goes first so might as well take advantage of that. Almost everytime when I do get to cut the lines it's due to the staff wanting to play with my 1.5 year old daughter. So they end up telling me to cut. Or sometimes they call me forward and they just service me first and there is no way I can know who is actually first. I also do not speak enough Indonesia to tell them no.

                      Only time I gladly ask to cut the line is immigration. At immigration I am not about to wait in line with 50 Chinese mainlanders who won't move over so my family can sit down. Or when they do they give us nasty look. Me cutting them when they do that to us is my way of telling him to screw himself and no one wants him there. Lol.

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                      • #12

                        I say alhamdulillah i am in a country with other muslims mashaallah. So the answer to the original question depend on what type of foreigner i suppose.

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                        • #13
                          A sense of entitlement based on religious affinity, I find objectionable. It would be preferable, as well, that points made without resorting to ethnic slurs.

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                          • #14
                            Huh???

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by waarmstrong View Post
                              A sense of entitlement based on religious affinity, I find objectionable. It would be preferable, as well, that points made without resorting to ethnic slurs.
                              So you object to people who have affinity with Prophet Muhammad (PBUH)?

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