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Maid and Driver's Salary for 2011

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  • Maid and Driver's Salary for 2011

    My husband is Indonesian and I am American. We live in Bangkok now but will be moving in January to Jakarta. I wondered if anybody could tell us what the average rate would be for maids and drivers that can speak some english and are live-in (maids). Even though my husband is from Jakarta, he isn't really up to date on what salaries are for 2011. Thanks!


    Tarra

  • #2
    Varies greatly. I come across anything from 900,000 a month to 2.5 million for a maid. Drivers are meant to get paid more but the basic starts around 1.3 million, not including overtime.

    We now pay our live-out maid 1.8 million a month which would be considered generous but we are happy with it. She works from 10 am to 6 pm, 5 days a week. It's our decision to not have her come in at weekends as we live in an apartment.
    Last edited by lantern; 27-09-11, 11:01.
    "[COLOR=#000000][FONT=Helvetica Neue]I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it.[/FONT][/COLOR]"
    George Bernard Shaw

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    • #3
      Hi there, I think you will find that the salary expectations really vary. I've recently interviewed a lot of people and it seems that the expectations from maids (live-in or live-out) that speak English seem to be about 1.5 - 1.8 million per month (base salary), plus food and transport. Most people I interviewed pushed for 1.8 million. Those that do not speak English can be hired cheaper, less than 1.5 million but probably more than 1.2. As for drivers, I would say anything a little less than 2 million would be the average.

      Good luck!

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      • #4
        I agree with the above estimates. We pay our pembantu Rp 1.7 million flat rate for 5.5 days/week. No transport or food allowance. If they work on a holiday (totally up to them), they get an extra Rp 50,000 for the day. I don't know if our maids speak English or not; it isn't a requirement for working at our house.

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        • #5
          Thank you All for replying! You guys are great! Thanks.

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          • #6
            Maid (live in, 6 days a week) - gets 1 Million per month with 50,000 each week transport money - no other allowances (food eaten at home covered by shopping bill) -
            Maid (live out, 6 half days per week 8.00-2.00) - gets 800,000 per month with 100,000 each week transport money - no allowances.

            Driver (6 days a week, live out) gets 1.2 Mill plus 50,000-100,000 per day food, petrol and overtime allowance.


            English of all is fairly mediocre, (same as my BI, but we get by)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by kingwilly View Post
              Maid (live in, 6 days a week) - gets 1 Million per month with 50,000 each week transport money - no other allowances (food eaten at home covered by shopping bill) -
              Maid (live out, 6 half days per week 8.00-2.00) - gets 800,000 per month with 100,000 each week transport money - no allowances.

              Driver (6 days a week, live out) gets 1.2 Mill plus 50,000-100,000 per day food, petrol and overtime allowance.


              English of all is fairly mediocre, (same as my BI, but we get by)

              Thats more like the proper wage for a maid and driver.

              Ray
              When my wife wants my opinion, she gives it to me

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              • #8
                Our live-in housekeeper is paid Rp. 700,000/month; all food and toiletries are provided; no English and essentially no-skills-right-off-the-turnip-truck. Ya, I know it’s not what most are accustomed to paying; perhaps that's why they stay an average of 18 months. Once my wife trains them they can command a better salary elsewhere. Our driver's pay is at the low side of average at 1.3 plus overtime and a daily food allowance.

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                • #9
                  I think the expectations vary a lot depending on what group the employer seems to fit into. My husband and I are both expats, we live in a ridiculously big house in Kemang, and there is a Fortuner parked in the driveway.

                  When I have been staff-hunting, I have been turned down by several people who didn't think I was offering them enough.

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                  • #10
                    I let my wife deal with it all but now I am feeling cheap. We pay our live in maid/nanny Rp550.000 / month and she can eat whatever she wants. Driver is 1Juta/ month plus Rp150.000 a week for food and Rp5.000 for any overtime (after 7 or on Sundays). Neither speak any English at all which isn't a problem and the maid is still as waarmstrong said "right off the turnip truck"

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by waarmstrong View Post
                      Our live-in housekeeper is paid Rp. 700,000/month; all food and toiletries are provided; no English and essentially no-skills-right-off-the-turnip-truck. Ya, I know it’s not what most are accustomed to paying; perhaps that's why they stay an average of 18 months. Once my wife trains them they can command a better salary elsewhere. Our driver's pay is at the low side of average at 1.3 plus overtime and a daily food allowance.
                      Originally posted by mattyboy43 View Post
                      I let my wife deal with it all but now I am feeling cheap. We pay our live in maid/nanny Rp550.000 / month and she can eat whatever she wants. Driver is 1Juta/ month plus Rp150.000 a week for food and Rp5.000 for any overtime (after 7 or on Sundays). Neither speak any English at all which isn't a problem and the maid is still as waarmstrong said "right off the turnip truck"
                      These salaries are more common among the Indo-Western couples I know. If the Indonesian spouse handles the communications, then English proficiency an expensive and unnecessary skill. A lot depends on where one lives. Live in a castle in PIK, Pondok Indah, Permata Hijau or any number of other high-rent areas, and the staff expects more largesse. Live in a more modest location, and it is easier to pay closer to what locals do.
                      This space is available for rent.

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                      • #12
                        There are various factors to consider. A live-in maid will usually be paid less as her expenses are covered. Expat families tend to rotate so while a maid may do well for 4 years she may find herself out of a job when the family moves on. English may be a neccessary skill for a maid who starts work with a family that has just arrived in Indonesia. The bottom line is that there is no shame is paying someone a decent salary if you think it's fair and you can afford it.
                        "[COLOR=#000000][FONT=Helvetica Neue]I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it.[/FONT][/COLOR]"
                        George Bernard Shaw

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nd_eric_77 View Post
                          These salaries are more common among the Indo-Western couples I know. If the Indonesian spouse handles the communications, then English proficiency an expensive and unnecessary skill. A lot depends on where one lives. Live in a castle in PIK, Pondok Indah, Permata Hijau or any number of other high-rent areas, and the staff expects more largesse. Live in a more modest location, and it is easier to pay closer to what locals do.
                          I agree. I would not describe our home as modest, but it’s not in one of the usual upscale expat infested neighborhoods. We live in the Cijantung area of Jakarta Timur where what we pay the help is considered extravagant by some of the locals. Most of the new hires don't realize there is a bule in the house until the first day of work, long after the rate has been agreed to.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by waarmstrong View Post
                            Most of the new hires don't realize there is a bule in the house until the first day of work, long after the rate has been agreed to.
                            Ah, the lost opportunity!
                            sigpic

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lone_ranger View Post
                              Ah, the lost opportunity!
                              Yes, my wife has become very tuned into the bule-effect. When shopping the pasar for bargainable clothing, shoes, and accessories, I am not allowed to tag along.

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