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  • Documents required for Indonesian nikah

    Greetings everyone.

    Just been checking requirements for Muslim wedding in Indonesia. My partner is Indonesian and i am a New Zealander.
    I understand i need 4 documents:

    a] Passport copy translated and legalized by govt. in NZ, then by Indonesian embassy.

    b]Birth cert translated and legalized by govt. in NZ, then by Indonesian embassy.

    c]Certificate of no impediment translated and legalized by govt. of NZ, then by Indonesian embassy, then with consular certificate attached at NZ embassy in Jakarta.

    d]My Islam certificate from NZ from 2 years ago notarized and translated and legalized here in NZ, then by Indonesian embassy. ( Although i should probably just get another one in Indonesia written in bahasa, although i dont want to be asked about khitan, which i haven't done.)

    Ive also thought of just not registering the wedding in Indonesia and registering it here in NZ at a later date at the marriage registry office, in effect marrying twice. NZ doesnt require any documents for marriage, just statutory declaration. Sometimes they'll ask a foreign spouse for an original birth cert. But my partner is having a meltdown at this option for some reason, thinking her family wont like it.

    Is there a cheaper way to do this? Because im estimating about 9.5 million rupiah for all this now. Can i convince a KUA to accept non translated, non legalized originals? Can i get the translation and legalization done on the cheap in INdonesia in a short period of time, ill only have 1-2 weeks in Indonesia before nikah.

    On a side note, whats with all the red tape and bureaucracy surrounding wedding registration in Indonesia? I see for foreign non citizens, non Muslims residing in Indonesia wanting to marry, they have to register marriage at least 10 days prior to event and supply a dump truck full of documents, including wait for it!!!... evidence of tax paid, police certificate and ive read somewhere, health cert ( ive read in some places), documents from immigration !!! I mean, when did marriage offices in Indonesia become tax enforcers, morality police and immigration enforcers. Its quite ridiculous really.
    IN New Zealand, as i mentioned before, marriage is very straight forward. Register intent to marry at least 3 days in advance. No documents required. Then marry with celebrant or at registry office. No documents required, citizen or not, just stat. declaration. Simple.

    Thanks for any help anyone. :-)

  • #2
    Why dont you marry in New Zealand. Sounds like its alot easier.

    1. Get a prenup in Indonesia so your partner can own property in Indonesia.
    2. Marry in New Zealand
    3. Get your marriage legalized by the indonesian ambassy in NZ
    4. Register your mariage at the KUA here. Dont forget to register your prenup also. You will get a line which states there is a prenup. I forgot to register my prenup and if I want to have the additional line on my Indonesian marriage certificate, I need to go to court first.
    5. Do a tradional wedding here in Indonesia for family and friends.

    Done.

    I also married in Holland because I found that it was alot easier paperwise than in Indonesia. Only need a passport and a birth certificate which is not older than 3 months.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah, thats what im thinking of doing. The traditional wedding ceremony at a restaurant in Jakarta, already booked, and then obtaining marriage certificate at later date once my partner arrives in NZ on visitor visa.

      But my partner is reluctant at this, thinking family wont like it.

      As for prenup, well, me and my partner have zero interest in owning property in Indonesia. We'll be residing in NZ.

      NZ relationship law is pretty reasonable. No prenup needed. Judges will throw them out if they are too imbalanced anyway.
      Generally any assets and cash from prior to relationship beginning remain separate property, any obtained during relationship are relationship property and split equally at divorce.

      Comment


      • #4
        But i would be happy if i could just get the documents translated and legalized cheaply and quickly in Indonesia.

        However, ive read this on the site:

        "Legalization of all documents is done by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Kementerian Luar Negeri), Directorate for Consular Affairs - Legalization Section, Jl. Taman Pejambon 6, Jakarta Pusat.

        Then these documents have to be translated into Bahasa Indonesia by a certified translator.

        The translations have to be validated by the Ministry of Justice (Kementerian Hukum dan HAM), Legalization Section, Jl. Rasuna Said 3, Kuningan, Jakarta Selatan and also by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

        When you finish all the paperwork detailed above, take it to your government's embassy in Jakarta where they can validate any necessary documents. In your home country, you can present these wide array of official documents to the local government to get a legal wedding certificate in your home country."


        This sounds like a lengthy and possibly slightly expensive process and not possible within the 1-2 week time ill have available in Indonesia prior to Nikah.




        Comment


        • #5
          About marrying twice, dont. The Indonesian law will see as you committing polygamie which is only aloud in certain circumstances.

          About legalizing documents, I believe if the documents are from NZ they should be legalized by the NZ minister of foreign affairs.

          You can translate the documents here in Indonesia. I remember it's not that expensive in comparison translating it in Holland, but I forgot how much it costs. I dont know where you or your partner live, but I used to use someone in Jakarta for my translations.

          Some advise on Indonesian parents, try to explain why you think it is such a pain dealing with the paperwork here and ask their permission to marry in NZ and get the mariage certificate there. If you are lucky, they will give you their permission. If not, and your partner cant live without her parent's consent... Welcome to the first hurdle of a mixed marriage.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Aidan1988 View Post
            (1) Passport copy translated and legalized by govt. in NZ, then by Indonesian embassy.

            (2) Birth cert translated and legalized by govt. in NZ, then by Indonesian embassy.

            (3) Certificate of no impediment translated and legalized by govt. of NZ, then by Indonesian embassy, then with consular certificate attached at NZ embassy in Jakarta.

            (4) My Islam certificate from NZ from 2 years ago notarized and translated and legalized here in NZ, then by Indonesian embassy. ( Although i should probably just get another one in Indonesia written in bahasa, although i dont want to be asked about khitan, which i haven't done.) ...

            (5) Is there a cheaper way to do this? Because im estimating about 9.5 million rupiah for all this now.

            (6) Can i convince a KUA to accept non translated, non legalized originals?

            (7) Can i get the translation and legalization done on the cheap in Indonesia in a short period of time, ill only have 1-2 weeks in Indonesia before nikah.

            (8) On a side note, whats with all the red tape and bureaucracy surrounding wedding registration in Indonesia? .., non Muslims .. they have to register marriage at least 10 days prior to event and supply a dump truck full of documents, ... evidence of tax paid, police certificate .. health cert ...

            (9) As for prenup, well, me and my partner have zero interest in owning property in Indonesia. We'll be residing in NZ.

            (10) "Legalization of all documents is done by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs .. The translations have to be validated by the Ministry of Justice ...

            First of all let me tell you that a KUA marriage is a lot simpler than you think . I suggest you to send a copy of the English version of your documents (without legalization) to your future spouse in advance , so she can talk to the KUA officers about what else they require . This because each KUA may have a little different "view" of the requirements .

            (1) Just a photocopy of the passport in most cases (mine included) .

            (2) Just an English version of the birth certificate may be enough . In my marriage , KUA preferred my country's identification card instead of the birth certificate .

            (3) Usually KUA requests an Embassy (in Indonesia) issued statement , but your Embassy does not issue it . This is what your Embassy in Jakarta says :
            [A Certificate of No Impediment (issued by the New Zealand Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) - Births, Deaths and Marriages) and a Consular Certificate provided by this Embassy are required by Indonesian authorities as a prerequisite for marriage in Indonesia.] @ https://www.mfat.govt.nz/en/countrie...-in-indonesia/
            In my personal case I also brought a document from my country , but my KUA did not request any additional document from my Embassy (no legalization too) .

            (4) This I don't know as I presented an Indonesian certificate . I would guess that a simple English or Arabic version is enough .

            (5) I spent around Rp1 million in KUA fee , just Rp75'000 per page of a sworn translation (English to Indonesian) of the alternative document for the Embassy's "Non Impediment to Marry" (in 2010) . I paid more because KUA helped my wife to get her divorce papers too .

            (6) Yes . This is why I suggest you to send a copy of everything (by email or similar) for KUA analysis .

            (7) In 10 year of this Forum I didn't see any member talk about legalizing documents for KUA (as far as I remember) . Sworn translation (at least from English to Indonesia) is probably around Rp100'000(US$ 7) per page , here in Indonesia . My translator asked me to send a copy by email , which you can do it before you come to Indonesia .

            (8) Not usual , as far as I know .

            (9) I suggest you to get it anyway as it is cheap (if you don't mind a generic version in Indonesian language , I paid Rp500'000 in 2010) . Living in Indonesia after retirement is a very good option , in my view (it is what I am doing now) .

            (10) I think this processes refer to a legalization of an Indonesian document to be used abroad where the foreign country requires that . It does not apply to you because your Embassy in Jakarta says : "There is no legal obligation to have your overseas marriage registered in New Zealand. Your Indonesian marriage certificate(s) will be recognised in New Zealand." See https://www.mfat.govt.nz/en/countrie...-in-indonesia/


            http://www.expat.or.id/info/gettingm...indonesia.html (generic list of required documents to marry)
            http://www.expat.or.id/info/mixmarriages.html
            http://www.expat.or.id/info/familylaw.html
            http://www.expat.or.id/info/marriage...lications.html
            http://www.expat.or.id/info/prenuptialagreement.html (about the prenup/separated wealth for buying Indonesian property)

            http://www.livinginindonesiaforum.or...th-certificate (post no.4 , example of a KUA marriage)

            http://www.livinginindonesiaforum.or...german-citizen (KUA marriage)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by marcus View Post


              First of all let me tell you that a KUA marriage is a lot simpler than you think . I suggest you to send a copy of the English version of your documents (without legalization) to your future spouse in advance , so she can talk to the KUA officers about what else they require . This because each KUA may have a little different "view" of the requirements .

              (1) Just a photocopy of the passport in most cases (mine included) .

              (2) Just an English version of the birth certificate may be enough . In my marriage , KUA preferred my country's identification card instead of the birth certificate .

              (3) Usually KUA requests an Embassy (in Indonesia) issued statement , but your Embassy does not issue it . This is what your Embassy in Jakarta says :
              [A Certificate of No Impediment (issued by the New Zealand Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) - Births, Deaths and Marriages) and a Consular Certificate provided by this Embassy are required by Indonesian authorities as a prerequisite for marriage in Indonesia.] @ https://www.mfat.govt.nz/en/countrie...-in-indonesia/
              In my personal case I also brought a document from my country , but my KUA did not request any additional document from my Embassy (no legalization too) .

              (4) This I don't know as I presented an Indonesian certificate . I would guess that a simple English or Arabic version is enough .

              (5) I spent around Rp1 million in KUA fee , just Rp75'000 per page of a sworn translation (English to Indonesian) of the alternative document for the Embassy's "Non Impediment to Marry" (in 2010) . I paid more because KUA helped my wife to get her divorce papers too .

              (6) Yes . This is why I suggest you to send a copy of everything (by email or similar) for KUA analysis .

              (7) In 10 year of this Forum I didn't see any member talk about legalizing documents for KUA (as far as I remember) . Sworn translation (at least from English to Indonesia) is probably around Rp100'000(US$ 7) per page , here in Indonesia . My translator asked me to send a copy by email , which you can do it before you come to Indonesia .

              (8) Not usual , as far as I know .

              (9) I suggest you to get it anyway as it is cheap (if you don't mind a generic version in Indonesian language , I paid Rp500'000 in 2010) . Living in Indonesia after retirement is a very good option , in my view (it is what I am doing now) .

              (10) I think this processes refer to a legalization of an Indonesian document to be used abroad where the foreign country requires that . It does not apply to you because your Embassy in Jakarta says : "There is no legal obligation to have your overseas marriage registered in New Zealand. Your Indonesian marriage certificate(s) will be recognised in New Zealand." See https://www.mfat.govt.nz/en/countrie...-in-indonesia/


              http://www.expat.or.id/info/gettingm...indonesia.html (generic list of required documents to marry)
              http://www.expat.or.id/info/mixmarriages.html
              http://www.expat.or.id/info/familylaw.html
              http://www.expat.or.id/info/marriage...lications.html
              http://www.expat.or.id/info/prenuptialagreement.html (about the prenup/separated wealth for buying Indonesian property)

              http://www.livinginindonesiaforum.or...th-certificate (post no.4 , example of a KUA marriage)

              http://www.livinginindonesiaforum.or...german-citizen (KUA marriage)
              Wow, thanks Marcus! Okay ill email copies of my documents to my partner and she can take them to KUA and ask them what to do with them. She can find a sworn translator too.
              Ill keep this thread updated on what happens.

              Comment


              • #8
                Forgot to say : I married in KUA , but the KUA's officer can do it in any place one chooses (but will charge more , obviously) .

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by marcus View Post
                  Forgot to say : I married in KUA , but the KUA's officer can do it in any place one chooses (but will charge more , obviously) .
                  Yeah, there is a 600,000 IDR charge to come to venue.

                  By the way Marcus, is a simple prenup something that can be arranged in a short period, within 10 days, prior to the nikah?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I think a prenup can be done in just 1 day , if the notaries in jakarta have the same/similar standard prenup like the notaries in Bandung have . You can ask your future spouse to check the prices and take a copy(pdf file ?) of the standard prenup (ask for "Perjanjian Pra Nikah/Pisah Harta") , so you two can read it . Here in Bandung the notary I dealt with told me that I could not modify the wording , but I could take one or more "articles" out (it was a long prenup which included who takes care of the day-by-day expenses , children , .. (so you can for example , take out the article regarding children) .
                    Cheaper if your future spouse doesn't tell the notary that she is marrying a foreigner or that she wants an English version (just for reading you can translate @ Google Translate . Just before you sign it , if you want you can translate it with a sworn translator .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Aidan1988 View Post

                      By the way Marcus, is a simple prenup something that can be arranged in a short period, within 10 days, prior to the nikah?
                      It depends on the notary if you can do it in a day or not. The work can be done in a day, but the notary will have to make time for it. Talk to the notary about your need(s) and if he can meet them. Make an appointment.

                      My prenup was made by a niece who is a notary. So that was pretty simple for us. Me and my wife just came over to her house without any idea what to put in a prenup. The 3 of us discuss what we wanted and my niece started ticking away. After 4 or 5 hours we were done. I doubt every notary will do it this way.

                      We made the prenup in Jakarta and it sounds like it was the same format as what marcus describe.

                      Maybe to cut time, your wife-to-be can ask for a copy of the prenup format. You and your partner can discuss and put on paper what you want to put in the prenup prior going to the notary to sign. Your partner can bring what is discussed to the notary so he can have it ready for you when you are in Indonesia. Read the prenup if it is as you agreed upon, sign, pay the fee and you're probably be done within an hour.

                      Although my prenup was for free, my niece gave it to us as a wedding present, she said she usually ask Rp 5.000.000 for it. This was in 2010.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by OpenSolutions View Post

                        It depends on the notary if you can do it in a day or not. The work can be done in a day, but the notary will have to make time for it. Talk to the notary about your need(s) and if he can meet them. Make an appointment.

                        My prenup was made by a niece who is a notary. So that was pretty simple for us. Me and my wife just came over to her house without any idea what to put in a prenup. The 3 of us discuss what we wanted and my niece started ticking away. After 4 or 5 hours we were done. I doubt every notary will do it this way.

                        We made the prenup in Jakarta and it sounds like it was the same format as what marcus describe.

                        Maybe to cut time, your wife-to-be can ask for a copy of the prenup format. You and your partner can discuss and put on paper what you want to put in the prenup prior going to the notary to sign. Your partner can bring what is discussed to the notary so he can have it ready for you when you are in Indonesia. Read the prenup if it is as you agreed upon, sign, pay the fee and you're probably be done within an hour.

                        Although my prenup was for free, my niece gave it to us as a wedding present, she said she usually ask Rp 5.000.000 for it. This was in 2010.
                        Alright guys, ill get my pacar to email me through a copy of the standard prenup form anda have a look through it. :-)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Just to follow up.
                          I had my nikah on 24 august.
                          Registering at KUA was pretty straight forward. Went in a few days before the nikah and showed them passport, birth certificate, certificate of no impediment with attached consular certificate and a certificate of my conversion to Islam.
                          The guy at KUA said he would get the documents translated himself. He also said something about needing to register at police but said he would arrange that himself. He also questioned why there was no proper visa in my passport, he then said i obviously didnt mention to the immigration officer at Soekarno Hatta i was there to marry, implying i should have applied for visa beforehand. Well, i just had the free visa stamp, i wasnt intending to stay in Indonesia long term and from what i understand the 30 day free visa is acceptable for marrying, so i dont really know what he was on about. Also the police thing was weird too, i thought that was only necessary for those living in Indonesia long term.
                          And he managed to extract 5 million rupiah as a fee, extra charge being for translation and police registering, and a bit of bule tax i suppose. :-D

                          Prenup was easy too, just got a random notary in Tangerang to draw one up, hand over 5 million rupiah, give it to KUA guy, stamp in buku nikah, done.
                          Just a pity my buku nikah has crease right down it from carrying it in hip bag with passport to Malaysia.

                          Tried to get a marriage certificate too from civil registry in Tangerang, but they said no, not for muslims, despite being told by a lawyer i could get one. Apparently some countries dont accept buku nikah as proof of marriage, they need authenticated marriage certificate. But for me, its not really an issue, my government says buku nikah is sufficient and i dont even need to register marriage in my country.
                          Just show copy of buku nikah to immigration when applying for visa to bring wife home.
                          And thats where the fun begins, my countries immigration department can be an absolute nightmare to deal with in regards to partnership visas. Pray for us. :-D

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