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International school for returning Indonesian expat?

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  • International school for returning Indonesian expat?

    Hi

    Hoping someone might have some information for us. We are an Indonesian family, stationed abroad for quite a long time, but possibly returning back to Indonesia sometime soon. A couple of years back, when we thought we returning then, I was told by some international schools in Jakarta that they cannot accept my daughters, because of a local law prohibiting Indonesians to enroll in international schools in Indonesia. We were told this by JIS and BIS. Does anyone know if this ruling still applies?

    Would appreciate any info.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by kraksanu View Post
    Hi

    Hoping someone might have some information for us. We are an Indonesian family, stationed abroad for quite a long time, but possibly returning back to Indonesia sometime soon. A couple of years back, when we thought we returning then, I was told by some international schools in Jakarta that they cannot accept my daughters, because of a local law prohibiting Indonesians to enroll in international schools in Indonesia. We were told this by JIS and BIS. Does anyone know if this ruling still applies?

    Would appreciate any info.

    Thanks
    Yes that is the regulation for country-related school (BIS etc).
    However there are many international school that do accept Indonesians now, such as Binus, Pelita Harapan, Global Jaya, etc.
    See some of them at http://www.expat.or.id/orgs/schools.html

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    • #3
      Sorry rayindra, you are wrong. LOTS of Indonesians attend JIS and BIS. The law changed quite some time ago.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Puspawarna View Post
        Sorry rayindra, you are wrong. LOTS of Indonesians attend JIS and BIS. The law changed quite some time ago.
        Oh really? Coz I tried to call them last year - JIS is literally my neighbor, and it is still not opened for my kid. Anyway, I know that some Indonesian millionaires' kids do study there, but maybe they have other passports or PR?
        But then again, perhaps the capacity problem as well.

        Many thanks for the update Puspa, have other kid I have to take care.
        Last edited by Rayindra; 25-01-14, 23:07.

        Comment


        • #5
          I realize JIS is expensive, but Puspa is correct. If your children were denied admission, it was not because they are Indonesian. The prohibition went out with the New Order.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Rayindra View Post
            Oh really? Coz I tried to call them last year - JIS is literally my neighbor, and it is still not opened for my kid. Anyway, I know that some Indonesian millionaires' kids do study there, but maybe they have other passports or PR?
            But then again, perhaps the capacity problem as well.

            Many thanks for the update Puspa, have other kid I have to take care.
            Your instincts are correct with respect to the capacity issue. I speculate (and this is just my assumption, not based on any official knowledge) that enrolling Indonesians at JIS has had consequences for the availability of spaces. Consider this - if an expat kid is enrolled in, say, 2nd grade, chances are they will attend in grades 2 through 4 or 5, then leave. So the slot will open up again. However, an Indonesian who starts school at JIS will likely stay through until graduation from 12th grade. As a result there are probably few slots available now.

            There are rules at JIS for who gets admitted first. I think (don't quote me on this, it's been years since my kid applied) that the hierarchy is something like this:

            - First preference to children of citizens from the founding countries
            - Second preference to other non-Indonesians
            - Third preference: Indonesians.

            So, all other things being equal, it is tougher for Indonesian kids to get a slot. But as a legal matter, they can and do get in, regular Indonesian passports and all.

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            • #7
              Thank you for all of your responses!

              If we do move back, I will try to apply to JIS and BIS again. Last time I asked (about 5 years ago), my daughter was in lower school. Now she is in upper school, so assuming that the number of students and applicants for upper school are similar to other international schools outside of Indonesia, there should be more seats available than lower school. So there is hope :-)

              Again, thank you all!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by kraksanu View Post
                Thank you for all of your responses!

                If we do move back, I will try to apply to JIS and BIS again. Last time I asked (about 5 years ago), my daughter was in lower school. Now she is in upper school, so assuming that the number of students and applicants for upper school are similar to other international schools outside of Indonesia, there should be more seats available than lower school. So there is hope :-)

                Again, thank you all!
                Re your bolded statement, logic dictates otherwise. Indonesian kids enter JIS and don't leave til they graduate, meaning that fewer slots open up the higher up the grade level one goes.

                However, I should stress that I'm only speculating. Other pressures, such as the need to pass national exams that schools like JIS don't prepare kids for, may cause Indonesian citizens to withdraw from international schools. I shall shut up now because, in case it isn't already obvious, I'm not really well-versed in the facts to support what I'm saying

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Puspawarna View Post
                  Sorry rayindra, you are wrong. LOTS of Indonesians attend JIS and BIS. The law changed quite some time ago.
                  My friends attempted to enroll their children at JIS, and they were told the following:
                  For a brief period in the mid-2000s, JIS enrolled WNI students. However, the government later insisted that all schools prepare WNI children for the UN. JIS had two options: HEAVILY modify their curriculum to prepare for the UN, or stop enrolling WNI students. JIS chose the latter. As a compromise, JIS allowed all WNI students who had enrolled during the brief inclusive period to remain at JIS through graduation. However, no new WNI students would be enrolled.
                  The implication is that International schools which do not prepare students for the UN are not following the law, and that JIS is following every regulation to the letter, regardless of how onerous said regulation may be.
                  nb: "UN" = National Exam; "WNI" = Indonesian citizen.
                  This space is available for rent.

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                  • #10
                    Oh dear, so no hope :-(
                    Is it compulsory for WNI to take the UN? I'm afraid that being in international schools since grade 1, it would be a nightmare bringing my daughter up to the level of math the Indonesian curriculum dictates. Not to mention, local history.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      For State Exam, i think it is not needed as long as your kids keep studying in International School up to graduation Year 12.
                      However, I think most of international schools other than the country specific (JIS, BIS, NZIS etc) have adopted the Indonesian curriculum as well.
                      Regarding the concern that your kids may not be able to cope with the new curriculum, you can use extra tutoring for a while.

                      For nd_eric, yes, I vaguely remember the JIS personnel also informed me about that rules, but I already forget about it. (Been a year and not really serious to enter there as well, because I thought it can't be done).

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                      • #12
                        My son's US based school doesn't prepare for the national exam, they also have no limits on accepting Indonesians as long as they bring a permission from whatever educational department supervises this that they don't need to participate in the national exam. The school makes it clear however during the admission process that their graduates should continue their education abroad as they will not be prepared for the indonesian system.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Rayindra View Post
                          For nd_eric, yes, I vaguely remember the JIS personnel also informed me about that rules, but I already forget about it. (Been a year and not really serious to enter there as well, because I thought it can't be done).
                          Hah hah, I also forgot that the policy of admitting Indonesians had been reversed - I should have remembered. A good thing nd_eric was around to set the record straight.

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                          • #14
                            I think the number of Indonesian students at JIS is limited to 22% of total student numbers. (same as for any other nationality).

                            Would be interesting to see how this all applies to dual nationality kids. Can they describe themselves as foreigners for purposes of getting into a school (eg where the quota for Indonesians is already full)?
                            Last edited by Berlarutlarut; 26-01-14, 19:53. Reason: not sure if those bits were correct

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                            • #15
                              As far as I know Indonesians are no longer statutorily prohibited from attending international schools. The admissions policies of individual schools is another matter. Another matter as well is the recent litany bone-headed decisions regarding the national curriculum.

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